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what is the thin hair covering the surface of my baby's body?

8 doctor answers
Dr. Scott J. Wolfson
21 years experience Pediatrics
Lanugo: At birth very often babies bodies are covered in areas with soft hair called lanugo. This hair will disappear over the next weeks.
Answered on Jun 6, 2015
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Dr. Florence Nwofor
Specializes in Pediatrics
Lanugo hair: I presume your baby is a newborn, this hair type is not coarse and is transient, will most likely regress within 6 months. No treatment is necessary for this condition.
Answered on Mar 23, 2011
Dr. Florence Nwofor
Specializes in Pediatrics
: Some babies may have darker coarser hair localized along the spine usually the lower back, this kind of hair distribution will need to be evaluated by a health care provider to screen for abnormalities of the spine.
Answered on Dec 25, 2014
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1 comment
Dr. Tanya Russo
Dr. Tanya Russo commented
24 years experience Pediatrics
Lanugo is a common finding in newborns, especially those born a little early. Lanugo is characterized by fine downy hair, usually light in color. It falls out on it's own and does not indicate abnormality. Hair as described by Dr. Nnebe warrants investigation.
Dec 25, 2014
Dr. Florence Nwofor
Specializes in Pediatrics
: Some babies may have a more permanent distribution in keeping ethnicity. This is notassociated with any health problem and does not geberally prove to be cosmetically unacceptable.
Answered on Jul 1, 2015
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1 comment
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Dr. Anne Phelan-adams
A Verified Doctor commented
A US doctor answered Learn more
I agree with Dr. Nnebe. Also, some babies, particularly if they[re premies, will also have fine downy hair called Lanugo on their bodies. It's often concentrated in the upper back and shoulders and falls off in due time.
Dec 25, 2014
Dr. Robert Kwok
32 years experience Pediatrics
Vellus hair: Fine colorless vellus hair (sometimes called peach fuzz) is normal on babies. Lanugo hair (another type of fine hairs) forms earlier and can be seen on premature babies. Lanugo hair is replaced by vellus hair as a baby matures.
Answered on Jun 3, 2011
Dr. Kevin Windisch
24 years experience Pediatrics
Lanugo: The hair is called lanugo, it will disappear after a short time.
Answered on Sep 28, 2016
Dr. Sue Hall
Dr. Sue Hall answered
37 years experience Pediatrics
Lanugo: The thin, fine hair covering the surface of the baby's body is most likely lanugo. Lanugo is more common in premature babies, and becomes less prominent as the baby progresses towards his due date.
Answered on Apr 8, 2015
6
6 thanks
Dr. Lori Semel
34 years experience Pediatrics
Lanugo: Lanugo is a thin, fine downy hair that is the first hair produces by the developing fetus' hair follicles. It starts at 3 months gestation and continues through the 9th month. At birth some babies are born with that fine hair that eventually falls off.
Answered on Jan 14, 2015

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