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A 42-year-old member asked:

Why do we get eye floaters?

3 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Willa Terry
Pediatrics 33 years experience
Age related change: The vitreous (connective tissue of the eye) becomes more liquid in people who are nearsighted or during the process of aging - then eye floaters may develop. It can also be a sign of retinal detachment, which need immediate medical attention, .
Created for people with ongoing healthcare needs but benefits everyone.
Dr. Keshav Narain
Retinal Surgery 30 years experience
Natural aging : It is a consequence of protein particles drifting within the vitreous fluid of our eye. They are common and harmless most of the time. If new or associated with other symptoms like flashes, the eye should be examined for retinal problems. If you see the other posts, i discuss the depolymerization of proteins in the vitreous. This is biochemically what happens as we age. Hope that helps.
Created for people with ongoing healthcare needs but benefits everyone.
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology 28 years experience
Floaters: Floaters are caused by the vitreous (jelly in the eye) detaching from the retina (typically a normal change in the aging eye). The vitreous clumps up or develops blurry areas within the jelly causing your floater. If when the vitreous changes, causing floaters, if the retina is torn you are at risk for a retinal detachment. You should have an examination. Tx: time, and possibly surgery.
Created for people with ongoing healthcare needs but benefits everyone.

Similar questions

A 41-year-old member asked:

Could it be eye cancer if i'm getting more and more floaters?

2 doctor answers6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Addagada Rao
General Surgery 57 years experience
It may not be cancer: If you are diabetic, and have high blood pressure, it may related to this , eye cancer is not the first thing you think of. More people loose their eye sight due to neglected diabetic retinal problems than to eye cancer, please see your doctor for eye examination.
Created for people with ongoing healthcare needs but benefits everyone.
A 46-year-old member asked:

How do I get rid of floaters in my eye?

2 doctor answers2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Jay Bradley
Cornea, Cataract, & Refractive (LASIK & PRK) Surgery 19 years experience
Floater removal: Most patients develop floaters at some point in their life. Over time your brain ignores them and they do not block vision. Due to this, there is nothing to do to remove them. In rare cases, floaters can be significant enough to block vision. In these rare cases, the floaters can be removed by a retina specialist by a surgery inside the eye (vitrectomy).
Created for people with ongoing healthcare needs but benefits everyone.
A 33-year-old member asked:

Why are my eye floaters getting bigger and worse?

2 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Amir Khan
Sports Medicine 28 years experience
See opthalmologist: Age and inflammation can commonly casuse the gel-like fluid (vitreous) in the eye to liquefy and detach leading to loose floaters. More than 50% of 80 year olds will have a vitreous detachment. 40 % of people with posterior vitreous detachments who also experience light flashes can have a 15% chance of developing a retinal tear. Therefore see an opthalomologist immediately.
Created for people with ongoing healthcare needs but benefits everyone.
A 39-year-old member asked:

How to get rid of eye floaters? When vitrectomy?

1 doctor answer7 doctors weighed in
Dr. Bruce Saran
Ophthalmology 34 years experience
Time: Most symptoms from floaters will diminish to a tolerable level with time. Patients will notice them in certain lighting situations or activities. Vitrectomy surgery markedly increases the risk of cataract formation and the small but real risk of retinal tear and detachment. Surgery is only indicated if floaters are severely diminishing your ability to perform activities of daily living.
Created for people with ongoing healthcare needs but benefits everyone.
Dr. Melissa Neal
Ophthalmology 17 years experience
If your doctor has confirmed that you do not have a retinal tear. The best way to notice your floaters is to try to not focus on them. By not focusing on the floaters your allow your brain to adapt to the your new visual stimuli. The more you are able to not focus on the new floaters the easier and shorter time it will take for your brain to adapt
Apr 4, 2012
A 47-year-old member asked:

Do you get more eye floaters from serious eye trauma?

2 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. David Speck
Ophthalmology 43 years experience
Possibly: Floaters come from vitreous debris or blood floating within the fluid of the interior of the eye. The more serious the injury to the eye, the more likely it will be that blood, retinal, or vitreous debris will be released within the eye. Any sudden increase in floaters should be evaluated promptly by an ophthalmologist to check for retinal detachment before the central vision is lost.
Created for people with ongoing healthcare needs but benefits everyone.
Last updated Apr 22, 2016

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