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Dr. Michael Ham

Ophthalmology
Prescott and Prescott Valley, AZ
27 years experience male

Locations

Office

Prescott and Prescott Valley, AZ

Address

412 Whipple Street, Prescott and Prescott Valley, AZ
Directions

About

Bio

Medical Profile Michael Ham, M.D., FACS Board Certified A native of Nebraska, Dr. Ham graduated from the University of Nebraska, Omaha in 1990 and its Medical Center in 1994. As a medical student, Dr. Ham provided care at the University of Arizona Medical Center and at a community hospital and clinic in Belize, Central America. He served his internship and received his specialty training in Ophthalmology at the Alton Ochsner Medical Foundation in New Orleans. During this time, he studied at five different clinics/hospitals under 22 different physicians, receiving the most comprehensive training available in advanced technology and techniques. Dr. Ham, a board-certified surgeon, performs a variety of eye surgeries and laser treatments including the Instant Vision (tm) cataract surgery, glaucoma surgery, laser treatment for diabetic retinopathy and Blepharoplasty and related plastic eye surgery. To date, he has performed over 12, 000 cataract and over 1,000 Blepharoplasty surgeries. He perfected techniques allowing him to complete cataract surgery in about 5 minutes, with the industry standard being approximately 14 minutes. His 5-Minute Instant VisionÔ cataract surgery helps to reduce risks and complications and accelerates recovery. Most patients of Dr. Ham’s cataract procedure return to normal activities the same day as surgery. As the Medical Director of the Kokopelli Eye Institute, Dr. Ham is committed to staying abreast of the latest changes in ophthalmic eye care and surgery. The Institute is dedicated to expanding knowledge of eye care issues through education directed at both healthcare professionals and the community at large. He supports the Tri-City community, providing both human and financial resources to local causes and charities. He also donated his time to staff the only medical clinic located on the bay island of Utila in Honduras. Dr. Ham was selected as one of America’s Top Ophthalmologists by the Research Council of America. He is a member of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, the American Medical Association, the American College of Surgeons and the Arizona Medical Association. Dr. Ham is licensed as a physician in Arizona, Alabama and Louisiana.

Specialties
Doctors may have more than one area of specialty interest. Board certification in a specialty area means the doctor has completed formal training and has practice experience in that specialty, and has passed the certification examination from the corresponding accredited medical specialty board.

Ophthalmology

Licenses

United States: Alabama, Arizona, Louisiana, New Mexico

Doctor Q&A

1.3K Answers
1.4K Agrees
The number of answers this doctor has agreed with.
A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology 27 years experience
Floaters: A posterior vitreous detachment causes floaters. This is a situation where the vitreous(jelly) of the eye detaches (not a retinal detachment), it the... Read More
A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology 27 years experience
Clogged oil gland: A sty is when an oil gland of the eyelid margin gets clogged and the oil backs up and forming a pocket of stagnant oil and the eyelid becomes inflamed... Read More
A 33-year-old female asked:
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology 27 years experience
Ocular migraines!: Ocular migraines are a form of migraines that take place in the occipital cortex (part of the brain that interprets/controls vision). They lack the s... Read More
A 33-year-old female asked:
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology 27 years experience
Ocular migraines!: Ocular migraines are a form of migraines that take place in the occipital cortex (part of the brain that interprets/controls vision). They lack the s... Read More
A 33-year-old male asked:
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology 27 years experience
Sparkles: Sounds like you had decreased blood flow to the occipital lobe of the brain, the part of the brain responsible for vision. There could be many causes... Read More
A 65-year-old female asked:
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology 27 years experience
More info: Need more info, but could be hemi-facial spasm, blepharospasm, or possibly myokymia due to stress.
A 20-year-old female asked:
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology 27 years experience
Doubt: It is possibly a side effect from the medication. Sounds as if you have allergic reaction or plain old dry eyes (which could be a side effect of this... Read More
A 39-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology 27 years experience
Cool compresses!: Try cool compresses. If no improvement see ophthalmologist.
A 19-year-old female asked:
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology 27 years experience
Yes: No problem, unless you damaged the eyelid skin or eyeball itself. Give it time and the lashes will go back to normal or fall out and regrow.
A 35-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology 27 years experience
Ocular migraines!: Ocular migraines usually only last from 1-30 minutes. They can last longer. Very rare for the symptoms to be permanent. I do not know of anyone los... Read More
A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology 27 years experience
Clogged oil gland: Possibly a sty. A sty is when an oil gland of the eyelid margin gets clogged and the oil backs up and forming a pocket of stagnant oil and the eyelid... Read More
A 34-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology 27 years experience
Can be normal: You may slowly get more myopic (nearsighted) as you age. This is common and can be normal. Some people progress all their life and can increase thei... Read More
A 61-year-old female asked:
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology 27 years experience
Dry eyes!: Start with artificial tears routinely (one drop 4 times a day every day), oral omega-3's, and warm compresses. Next, medicated drops (restasis, mild ... Read More
A 33-year-old female asked:
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology 27 years experience
Ocular migraines!: Ocular migraines are a form of migraines that take place in the occipital cortex (part of the brain that interprets/controls vision). They lack the s... Read More
A 40-year-old female asked:
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology 27 years experience
CT or MRI: Ocular migraines are a form of migraines that take place in the occipital cortex (part of the brain that interprets/controls vision). They lack the s... Read More
A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology 27 years experience
Lubricate!: You can try lubricating the eyes with artificial tears one drop 3-4 times a day and taking oral omega 3's like evoa dry eye supplements to stimulate m... Read More
A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology 27 years experience
Yes: If the injury affected the visual pathway or occiptal lobes of the brain.
A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology 27 years experience
Dry eyes!: No cure, but you can start with artificial tears routinely (one drop 4 times a day every day), oral omega-3's, and warm compresses. Next, medicated d... Read More
A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology 27 years experience
No: There is no connection between cataracts and fuchs. Cataract surgery can exacerbate the fuchs.
A 51-year-old female asked:
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology 27 years experience
Xanthelasma: Sounds like xanthelasma. This is benign, and can be surgically removed for cosmetic reasons.
A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology 27 years experience
Optic nerve: Optic nerve causes a blind spot about 17.5 degrees temporally.
A 32-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology 27 years experience
NO: Contact lens wearing will not slow the natural progression of cataracts!
A 21-year-old male asked:
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology 27 years experience
Dry eyes: Most likely a response (reflex) due to the cold air and / or dry air that comes from house or car heaters. Could be getting some nasal congestion caus... Read More
A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology 27 years experience
Training: Both have a college degree. An optometrist has 3-4 years of eye training allowing them to diagnose and treat many eye conditions as well as prescribe ... Read More
A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology 27 years experience
Floaters: Sounds as if you have had a posterior vitreous detachment. This is a situation where the vitreous(jelly) of the eye detaches (not a retinal detachmen... Read More
A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology 27 years experience
No: It is not possible. The lens is inside your eye and dust can not get to the lens. Sounds as if you may have floaters.
A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology 27 years experience
Varies: After high school usually a four college degree and then special optometry training of 3-5 years.
A 27-year-old female asked:
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology 27 years experience
Chapped skin: Most likely you are developing a dermatitis due to the constant moisture. I have had success with many patients by having them wash and dry the area... Read More
A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology 27 years experience
Ocular migraines!: Ocular migraines are a form of migraines that take place in the occipital cortex (part of the brain that interprets/controls vision). They lack the s... Read More
A 28-year-old male asked:
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology 27 years experience
Eye twiching: If you mean the eyelid blinking of fluttering, it my be myokymia due to stress or simply dryness of the eye. If the eyelid(s) contract fully, and is ... Read More
A 33-year-old female asked:
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology 27 years experience
Bleed: This is a sub-conjunctival hemorrhage. As long as the vision is unchanged and there is no pain, everything should be fine. If it is a little irritat... Read More
A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology 27 years experience
See PCP: You need a work up. This could be caused by many things sinusitis, tooth infection, viral syndrome, etc.
A 59-year-old female asked:
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology 27 years experience
No: At the beginning stages there is typically no symptoms!
A 45-year-old female asked:
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology 27 years experience
Typically no: Typically not unless there was trauma to the eyeball with the blepharoplasty surgery, which would be very uncommon to rare (I have never seen ... Read More
A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology 27 years experience
Warm compresses!: Sty! you can use warm compresses - a washcloth with warm water and hold it to the closed eye for 5-10 minutes 3 times a day. You can massage it with... Read More
A 25-year-old male asked:
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology 27 years experience
Dry eyes!: Sounds like inflammation from dry eyes. They dry out during the day and become inflamed, the inflammation worsens while eyes are closed and no tear tu... Read More
A 32-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology 27 years experience
Yes: If you wand to be free of glasses, it is an option. Consult with a lasik specialist.
A 33-year-old female asked:
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology 27 years experience
Ocular migraines!: Ocular migraines are a form of migraines that take place in the occipital cortex (part of the brain that interprets/controls vision). They lack the s... Read More
A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology 27 years experience
See your doctor: You need to see and eye specialist. But until then you can use artificial tears or ointment (refresh pm) to sooth. Keeping it closed may help also. ... Read More
A 34-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology 27 years experience
Allergies!: Sounds like allergies! try antihistamine or over the counter allergy medications. If no improvement see ophthalmologis.
A 21-year-old female asked:
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology 27 years experience
Not normal!: You need to see a doctor. Could be many things. Dehydration. Hormonal. Hypertensive. Pre eclampsia. Possibly normal.
A 27-year-old female asked:
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology 27 years experience
Blood: Is it where the white part of the eye (sclera) usually is? If so, it is usually benign and will clear with time (1-21 days), use artificial tears and... Read More
A 71-year-old female asked:
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology 27 years experience
Transient???: If it is transient or resolves within 5 minutes to 24 hours, it could be a migraine variant.
A 27-year-old male asked:
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology 27 years experience
Floaters: It sounds as if you have had a posterior vitreous detachment. This is a situation where the vitreous(jelly) of the eye detaches (not a retinal detach... Read More
A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology 27 years experience
Recurrent errosion: Recurrent corneal erosion. This is where the epithelium, skin layer, that was scratched (the abrasion) does not completely heal down and will recurre... Read More
A 35-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology 27 years experience
Secondary cataract: Secondary cataract is a condition where the posterior capsule (the clear membrane behind the lens) becomes cloudy or scarred. Immediately after surge... Read More
A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology 27 years experience
Blind left eye. : Not sure. Not normal and you need to see an eye specialist.
A 31-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology 27 years experience
Istalol: Istalol is a beta-blocker drug that also reduces pressure inside the eye. Side effects can include, but are not limited to, blurred vision, double vis... Read More
A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology 27 years experience
Dry eyes!: Sounds like you have dry eyes. Use artificial tears (consider preservative free) and oral omega-3's to make them more moist. Use the tear drops one ... Read More
A 30-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology 27 years experience
Many: Too many things! sinusitis, migraine, dehydration, brain tumor, etc. See pcp.

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Testimonials
Recommendations and Thank you notes are endorsements given from patients or other doctors.

16
Recommendations
950
Thank you notes
Sep 22, 2014
A great Ophthalmologist! Very knowledgeable in eye surgery, eye medicine, and many other areas of medicine also. Gives excellent answers. A great resource on Health Tap. Highly recommend.
Apr 20, 2015
Great doctor. Consistently gives thoughtful, insightful and expert advice.
Dec 22, 2015
Highly recommend
HealthTap member
Thank you, your answer or tip was very helpful! thanx doctor, very helpful. This my first time happen to my eye, it never happen before in my life, i taught there was something hit my eye.
HealthTap member
Thanks for your quick reply! Thank you for your feed back I need to no more your answer was applicable to my brothers situation thank you.
HealthTap member
Thank you, your answer or tip was very helpful! Thanks so much. I cant sleep from worrying going to the doctor first thing in the morning

Education & Training

Medical/Graduate school

University of Nebraska College of Medicine, NE
Graduated 1994MD

Awards

Top Doctor, Second Place, Arizona - Winter
2013
Thought Leader, Second Place, Arizona - Winter
2013
Top Ophthalmologist , Third Place, National - Winter
2013

Affiliations

Kokopelli Eye Institute
90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions, provide medical advice, write prescriptions, and more.
Answer emailed
in 24 hours or less