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A 32-year-old member asked:

what about allergy drops instead of shots?

2 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Richard Lavi
Allergy and Immunology 21 years experience
Not FDA-approved: Sublingual or allergy drops are not currently fda-approved in the United States. Studies conducted in the United States have shown mixed results for their effectiveness. At this time, they are an alternative to injections only in rare cases.
Dr. Mark Diamond
Pediatrics 46 years experience
More Research: There is some some research data supprting their usage, but much more is needed to assure safety and whether they are effective enough to justify the time and expense.

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Similar questions

A 34-year-old member asked:

What are allergy drops and what are they used for?

1 doctor answer2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Michael Zacharisen
Allergy and Immunology 33 years experience
Not FDA approved: Allergy drops may be the future of treating seasonal, year round allergies and even food allergies. They have been used in europe for many years in place of allergy injections. While they may be safer in some respects to allergy shots, effectiveness of the drops seems to be less. Currently no fda approved allergy drop in U.S., so stay tuned and wait for good data/science to know risks/benefits.
Port Neches, TX
A 38-year-old male asked:

I was just watching on news about allergy drops being 80 percent curable .i doing the shots are they just as effective as drops? Been doing shots 7 we

1 doctor answer2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Kristin Sokol
Allergy and Immunology 12 years experience
Allergy shots: Allergy shots (immunotherapy) is usually standardized and given in a monitored environment. Allergy drops are not. There is likely less allergen in drops, and therefore less effective. Also, there is a risk of side effects like oral itching and swelling. Taking allergy drops at home always a risk of a severe allergic reaction in an unmonitored environment.

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Last updated Oct 3, 2016

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