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A member asked:

what foods are good for the gout? he has had the gout since easter, and has been taking indomethizde?

3 doctor answers3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Howard Fox
Podiatry 42 years experience
First, : First, some background: it starts with a build-up of uric acid in the blood. Uric acid is the byproduct of protein metabolism. When we eat protein, the liver breaks it down to amino acids, which we need, and the waste product of this metabolic process is uric acid. The kidneys remove the uric acid from the blood. So at any given time, the liver is always producing uric acid while the kidneys are getting rid of it. So there is always a "normal" amount of uric acid in our blood. If the liver is producing too much, or the kidneys aren't getting rid of enough, the amount of uric acid in the blood rises. With some people, when the uric acid gets to a certain point, the salt of the uric acid forms crystals in a joint. It seems to like the big toe joint, but we don't know why. If not the big toe, then another small joint. It doesn't like big joints. And, it almost is always only in one joint at a time. If more than one joint is red, hot, swollen and painful, it's probably not gout. What you're seeing with the redness, heat, swelling and pain is essentially a foreign body reaction to the sodium monourate crystals inside the joint. The body is trying to wall-of the crystals with an inflammatory reaction. Gout patients typically can give me the exact time they started feeling the pain. 4:07 am. Not 4:06. They were fine at 4:06. But at 4:07, it hits like a ton of bricks. So, given that uric acid is produced in the liver as the result of protein ingestion, it's been thought that foods rich in protein lead to gout, thus giving it the nickname the "rich man's disease, " because foods rich in protein, like steak, lobster and such, are expensive. It turns out diet has very little to do with gout with one big exception, and that's beer. Alcohol can raise uric acid levels, and so can Aspirin and some water pills, but beer has turned out to be notorious. To better answer your question, there is no food or drink that will help "cure" a gouty attack. Indomethacin is a commonly used oral anti-inflammatory that works well with gout. It is best given with a loading dose (starting at a high dose, and slowly tapering down to a low dose over 5 days). But if hubby has been in pain since easter, something is amiss. It might be that the dose of Indomethacin isn't high enough, or there was no loading dose, or he's taking a medication that is known to raise uric acid, or he needs something else. Many podiatrists are very familiar with gout, being it almost always tends to affect the foot. Given that he's already on the Indomethacin and still in pain, you might want to visit your local podiatrist and find out what else might be going on there, or change treatments. Good luck. Hope he feels better.
Dr. Daniel Weiss
Endocrinology 46 years experience
There : There are two main forms of gout. Acute gout causes sudden pain, redness and swelling in a joint. Gout is related to uric acid. Meats tend to increase uric acid in the blood and alcohol reduces the ability of the kidneys to get rid of uric acid. No foods will reduce the pain from a gout attack. We do not usually recommend using strong anti-inflammatory drugs like Indomethacin for more than a few days. If you have repeated attacks of gout, lowering your level of uric acid in the blood helps. Allopurinol or Febuxostat do that. Colchicine is usually used when one of these drugs is started and Colchicine is continued for a few months then stopped. Rheumatologists are usually the experts on gout.
Dr. Gary Sterba
Rheumatology 47 years experience
Good : Good and elaborated are both answers to your question , by drs fox and weiss. Gout is a systemic disease that should be tretaed by the rheumatologist , who is also an internist . The entire physiopathology was extensively explained , and as you can read , there are no foods good for goutu , but foods that con lessen the attacks and the frecuency and the acumulation of that pool of uric acid. The ideal number for long term control for the " normal " uric acid level should be no higher than six and that could be obatined with je two meds mentioned by dr weiss. Colchicine could be used to reduce the frecuency of acute episodes, when taken daily on a long term basis on a patient that has frecuent acute attacks.

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