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A 34-year-old member asked:

does having brain surgery make it more likely that i will have a stroke later?

3 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
Dr. J. C. DiGiacomo
General Surgery 35 years experience
No: Stroke are a result of blood perfusion issues. If you have recovered from brain surgery, the issue of blood flow to the brain should not be an issue, but you should discuss your specific case with your neurosurgeon.
Dr. MARIE RENEE M DOMERCANT
Pharmacology 30 years experience
Answer: With any surgery there's a possibility of complications: that's the reason there is an observatory period to monitor the patient vital signs after a procedure.
Dr. Kevin Vaught
Neurosurgery 28 years experience
No: Having a craniotomy does not independently increase your risk of stroke later on. The risk factors for stroke are not influenced by surgery. If your reason for surgery was a stroke, a neurologist can counsel on risk modification strategies.

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Similar questions

A 40-year-old member asked:

What age is considered too old to try brain surgery as a possible cure?

2 doctor answers3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Timothy Ashley
Internal Medicine and Pediatrics 15 years experience
It depends: All medical decisions have to balance risks with benefits. For many procedures, higher age carries higher risk. There is almost never a hard age cutoff, but if the risk of death or other complications is very high, from age or other reasons, the surgeon may judge the benefit too minimal to justify the risk- "first do no harm". A surgeon should be able to explain individual decisions about risk.
CA
A 25-year-old member asked:

Are brain operations for Parkinson's usually safe?

2 doctor answers6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Ramin AmirNovin
Neurosurgery 21 years experience
Mostly: Deep brain stimulation surgery for Parkinson's is mostly safe. Like any surgery, the most common risks of this surgery are headaches, infection, and non-responsiveness to the therapy. The most troublesome/dangerous risk is that of stroke (bleeding in the brain) and occurs in ~1% of patients.
CA
A 23-year-old member asked:

Can I still fly on a plane after having a major stroke and brain surgery?

3 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Nader Pouratian
Neurosurgery 18 years experience
Yes: Once recovered from surgery, one should be able to fly without restriction. However, individual surgeons may vary as to when exactly you can fly.
A 52-year-old member asked:

Can split brain surgery treat parkinson's?

2 doctor answers6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Ramin AmirNovin
Neurosurgery 21 years experience
No: Parkinson's is best treated with medications first and then if not improving, it can be treated using deep brain stimulation. As of today, there are no cures for Parkinson's and hence despite either therapy, most patient will slowly worsen with time.
A 35-year-old member asked:

What do you think about brain surgery to help with seizures?

1 doctor answer2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Olav Jaren
Neurology 19 years experience
When to do it: Not everyone should have surgery to control seizures. People who have failed 3 or more medications that should prevent seizures, and who have a focus or origin of their seizures (partial onset) may be candidates for epilepsy surgery. People with generalized epilepsy may find a vagal nerve stimulator to be helpful. Does that answer your question?

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Last updated May 4, 2016

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