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Warner Robins, GA
A 47-year-old female asked:

My mri report says i have chronic microvascular ischemic disease with scattered lacunar infarcts. could you explain what this means, please?

2 doctor answers2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Masoud Sadighpour
Internal Medicine 38 years experience
WMC: White matter changes in MRI is non-specific, but mostly is due to insufficiency of very small vessels in brain of people with high blood pressure or diabetes. Small strokes causes lacunar infarcts. Please discuss it with pcp.
Dr. Brian Sabb
Sports Medicine 25 years experience
Small brain infarcts: Hi, according to your report, your MRI shows abnormalities in your brain that were felt to relate to small areas of damaged neural (brain) tissue. Damage caused by "ischemia" or insufficient oxygen/blood supply. "chronic" refers to a longstanding process versus "acute" which would indicate a recent brain injury. It could be important to quantify the degree of disease: mild, moderate, or severe.

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Last updated Jan 26, 2020
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