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A 34-year-old female asked:

Mom has her procedure tomorrow to find out where this gi bleed is coming from. she still having a lot of rectal bleeding and have been getting blood transfusion. could this be related to her copd, diabetic, chf or her pulmonary hypertension or is this com

5 doctor answers13 doctors weighed in
Dr. Rick Koch
Cardiology 23 years experience
Probably separate: While your mom has a multitude of medical problems this is likely a separate problem unless there was more information as your question was cut off.
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Dr. Mark Hoepfner
Surgery 40 years experience
Not directly related: To the listed medical problems. Most common sources of bleeding could be small blood vessels on the surface of the lining of the colon (vascular malformation), or from sites of diverticulosis. Less likely is a bleeding stomach ulcer. Many of these will stop bleeding spontaneously, but some will need surgery to remove the bleeding site. Her medical conditions may make her surgery risks higher.
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Dr. Rada Ivanov
Pulmonary Critical Care 32 years experience
Probably not: Probably not directly related but the stress from being sick can give her ulcers which may cause the GI bleed.
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Dr. Joshua Murphy
Pediatric Cardiology 20 years experience
Possibly AVMs?: A condition called hht or osler-weber-rendu is associated with abnormal arteriovenous malformations (avms) these can occur in lungs, liver, head, and GI tract.... These avms when in the lungs allow a small to moderate amount of blood to pass through the lungs without getting oxygen... Thus mistaken as pneumonia or asthma in kids and called COPD in adults. Gi tract bleeding from avms is common.
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Dr. Wojciech Skrzypiec
Pulmonary Critical Care 37 years experience
Very unlikely: Hepatopulmonary syndrome and portopulmonary hypertention can have pulmonary hypertension with GI bleeding which would be secondary to liver cirrhosis and collateral circulation. These syndromes are very uncommon and liver disease is first. Copd, CHF and diabetes do not result in GI bleeding.
Created for people with ongoing healthcare needs but benefits everyone.
Last updated Oct 10, 2020
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