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A 40-year-old member asked:

What is mitral valve stenosis?

2 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Brian Mott
Thoracic Surgery 30 years experience
Narrowing: This is a narrowing of the valve opening usually caused by rheumatic fever. It eventually leads to respiratory symptoms and heart failure. Fortunately it can be successfully treated with surgery.
Dr. Calvin Weisberger
52 years experience
Mitral valve: The mitral valve has to open properly to let blood flow into the left ventricle from the atrium. If it doesn't, we call this stenosis. It has to close to keep the blood flowing toward the body, if it doesn't we call this regurgitation or insufficiency. Either or both problems can exist with the valve if its abnormal. Insufficiency is more common.

Similar questions

A 29-year-old member asked:

Is mitral valve stenosis dangerous or not?

1 doctor answer4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Benjamin Nguyen
A Verified Doctoranswered
14 years experience
Depends: This depends on how severe the stenosis is. It is important to see a cardiologist and continue to watch this condition closely as it changes over time, and you may need surgery at some point in time.
A 52-year-old member asked:

How do you diagnose mitral valve stenosis?

2 doctor answers6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Martin Bress
Internal Medicine 51 years experience
Stethoscope & echo: Mitral stenosis can be diagnosed by a characteristic murmur heard with a stethoscope. This can be confirmed by an echocardiogram (an ultrasound exam) which can help assess the severity of the narrowing of the valve.
CA
A 16-year-old member asked:

How could mitral valve stenosis be prevented?

2 doctor answers2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Mark Stern
Cardiology 47 years experience
Avoid rheumatic feve: Avoiding rheumatic fever, avoids rheumatic heart disease which causes mitral stenosis. This can be accomplished by treating strep throat with penicillin.
CA
A 44-year-old member asked:

How could mitral valve stenosis be treated?

2 doctor answers3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Irv Loh
Dr. Irv Lohanswered
Cardiology 50 years experience
If severe, surgery: True, classical mitral stenosis is caused by rheumatic fever. Some types can be very aggressive causing compromised cardiac output & symptoms of marked shortness of breath & fatigue. There are no medical interventions that treat mitral stenosis. This leaves, when the time is appropriate, surgical repair or replacement. Balloon based interventions have not proven to be satisfactorily effective.
A 37-year-old member asked:

I may have mitral valve stenosis. Is that bad?

2 doctor answers3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Benjamin Nguyen
A Verified Doctoranswered
14 years experience
Depends: This depends on how severe the stenosis is. It is important to see a cardiologist and continue to watch this condition closely as it changes over time, and you may need surgery at some point in time.
Last updated Oct 3, 2016
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