U.S. doctors online nowAsk doctors free
A 40-year-old member asked:

Why don't stroke patients get tpa (alteplase) therapy?

2 doctor answers2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Jonathan Dissin
Neurology 39 years experience
Patients wait: The most common reason is they wait too long before presenting to hospital. Current guidelines for t-pa in most hospitals have been extended from 3to 4.5->5 hours after the onset of symptoms of a stroke. Part of the problem is many patients wake up with weakness/speech difficulties, the time of onset can't be determined, the patient is ineligible.Recent major surgery or bleeding are exclusions.
Dr. Michael Korona
Interventional Radiology 33 years experience
They can: If having a stroke one can receive intravenous tpa (alteplase) up to 3 hours once symptoms begin and up to 4.5 hours in certain cases. After this intra.

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

Ask doctors free
Educational text
Free
Talk to a doctor
24/7 visits - just $39!
50% off with $15/month membership

Similar questions

A 36-year-old member asked:

How much time to hold tpa (alteplase) if a patient had stroke and is on dabigatran therapy?

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. Bennett Werner
Cardiology 44 years experience
No TPA (alteplase): Dabigatran is an absolute contraindication to TPA (alteplase) use. The stroke patient in question is not a candidate for TPA (alteplase).

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

Ask doctors free
Educational text
Free
Talk to a doctor
24/7 visits - just $39!
50% off with $15/month membership
Last updated Jan 31, 2015

Disclaimer:

Content on HealthTap (including answers) should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment, and interactions on HealthTap do not create a doctor-patient relationship. Never disregard or delay professional medical advice in person because of anything on HealthTap. Call your doctor or 911 if you think you may have a medical emergency.