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A 41-year-old member asked:

why should someone with multiple sclerosis not be exposed to high temperatures?

3 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. J. patrick Tokarz
Specializes in Family Medicine
NOT Hot: Heat can make symptoms worse.
Dr. Virginia Simnad
Neurology 28 years experience
Uhthoff's phenomenon: Ms used to be diagnosed using the "hot tub test": demyelination, or loss of insulation around nerve fibers in the brain or spinal cord can slow or drop the impulse when core body temperature rises. It is reversible, and causes no permanent damage. A patient with ms put in a hot tub may find the legs become numb and heavy, thus needing help getting out!
Dr. Bennett Machanic
Neurology 52 years experience
Temporary worsening: Hot temperatures change cellular membrane capacity to maintain potassium channels, which results in inefficient nerve conduction function, bringing on either new symptoms or worsening of old symptoms. May be termed a pseudo-relapse, and improves with air conditioning, or lowering of body temperature.

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Similar questions

A 31-year-old member asked:

Can you please explain why it's bad for someone with multiple sclerosis to be exposed to high temperatures?

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. Bennett Machanic
Neurology 52 years experience
Lack of insulation: The nerves lose myelin insulation covering, and hot temperatures leach potassium out of the cells, worsening a prior impaired communication system, with expression of symptoms and fatigue due to the heat. This is reversible if cooler surroundings available.
A 35-year-old member asked:

I was wondering what are the first signs that you have multiple sclerosis (ms)?

1 doctor answer3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Bennett Machanic
Neurology 52 years experience
Excellent question: Subtle problems early on can be very misleading and indeed, can confuse docs. Some common early signs include loss of vision in one eye, weakness in legs or arms, electrical shocks on flexing neck, gait imbalance or incoordination, numbness or tingling, vague persistent fatigue, even confusion or disorientation. Mri's are commonly helpful.
A 32-year-old member asked:

I was wondering what are some therapies for multiple sclerosis?

2 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Donald McCarren
Neurology 36 years experience
Immunomod/supp Rx: The current therapies are broken down into the platform drugs- abcr (avonex, betaseron, copaxone, rebif) and the newer agents which are more immunosuppressive such as tysabri (natalizumab) and gilenya. 2 new oral agents (tecfidera and aubagio) have not been on the market long enough to see if they too can cause opportunistic infections. I hope this helps but please discuss with your neurologist. Be well!
A 35-year-old member asked:

Please let me know if there is a cure for multiple sclerosis ?

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. Bennett Machanic
Neurology 52 years experience
Not yet: No cure yet, but some terrific disease control interventions: most effective meds include tysabri, (natalizumab) gilenya, and perhaps tecfidera. The original self-injectables are playing lesser roles these days. Added success achieved by supplementing vitamin d-3, and following low fat, low salt diet.
A 40-year-old member asked:

Can I have multiple sclerosis, how can I know?

1 doctor answer2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Bennett Machanic
Neurology 52 years experience
Complex: Why do you believe you might have ms? Best to have your symptoms evaluated by an expert neurologist, who can guide you to a variety of tests which can confirm your underlying problem.

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Last updated Jun 17, 2015
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