A 24-year-old female asked:
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i had an unplanned c-section and was put under general anesthesia. why couldn't my husband stay in the or?

5 doctor answers
Dr. David Kurss
38 years experience Obstetrics and Gynecology
Usual protocol : As opposed to local anesthetic cases that are less complicated and potentially overwhelming for an onlooking family member, a general anesthetic case is more involved and can be somewhat disconcerting to even the casual onlooker.
Answered on Feb 2, 2017
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7 thanks
Dr. Hector Chapa
24 years experience Obstetrics and Gynecology
Varies: First, i trust you and your baby are well. There are several reasons why a partner is not allowed in the or for an "unplanned" cesarean. First, is to provide you- the patient- with undivided attention. Secondly, under general anesthesia, you would not be able to communicate to your partner and that is at times difficult for the visiting husband to take in. It can be summed up in 1 word: safety.
Answered on Oct 5, 2013
2
2 thanks
Dr. Orrin Ailloni-Charas
28 years experience Anesthesiology
Typically: Partners or other designees are allowed in the or to comfort the mom and have a ring side seat for the delivery. With a general anesthetic, not only is mom completely out, not requiring emotional support, but things are usually a little more tense and fast. It could be a very upsetting experience for a bystander.
Answered on Feb 19, 2013
Dr. Richard Pollard
29 years experience Anesthesiology
Safety: In an emergency c-section the obstetrician is concentrating on getting the child out of the uterus. The anesthesiologists is concentrating on keeping the mother alive. During this surgery we cannot pay attention to the father in the room, nor can we be distracted by him. I am sorry that this had to happen, but it was safer for you and the baby. I hope that this answers your question.
Answered on Apr 24, 2015
Dr. Elizabeth Wallen
34 years experience Pediatrics
Reasons vary : but in my mind, the purpose of the dad being in the delivery room is to be of support to YOU. Since you are unconscious, that support is not needed. General anesthetics are more complicated and require more hands on attention from the anesthesiologist. Frankly, Dads are in the way. The baby is whisked out of the OR immediately straight to the nursery so he can be right there.
Answered on Jun 21, 2014
2
2 comments
Dr. Ronald Herring
16 years experience Anesthesiology
If you had to have a general anesthetic there was significant danger to you and the baby. This is not a spectator sport.
Jun 20, 2014
Dr. Alexander Bankov
36 years experience Anesthesiology
Agree. Seeing you unconscious with the breathing tube can also be traumatic for the unprepaired husband; sorry - amily members are not present for the other surgeries under general anesthesia; and passengers usu. are not allowed in the pilots cockpit, either
Jun 20, 2014

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