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A 33-year-old member asked:

What is raynaud's phenomenon?

2 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Robert Cuff
Vascular Surgery 24 years experience
Vasoapastic response: Raynaud's phenomenon is an exaggerated vasoapastic response to cold weather and stress. The blood vessels of the extremity normally dilate and constrict with temperature changes. This occurs to an extreme degree in patients with raynauds. They will experience blue or white fingers or toes when exposed to cold temperature or stress. This is self-limiting and rarely causes significant problems.
Dr. Rodeen Rahbar
Vascular Surgery 20 years experience
Red, White, and Blue: Named after a french physician, raynaud's is improper regulation of blood flow. Pain and changes to the colors of the fingers and hand in response to cold (air conditioning, ice cubes, etc) or stress occurs as follows: the fingers turn white as the blood vessels constrict, then turn blue as the oxygen levels drop, then turn red upon rewarming. Usually benign, but see your doctor to be sure!

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A 45-year-old member asked:

What are the tests for raynaud's phenomenon?

1 doctor answer3 doctors weighed in
Dr. John Goldman
Rheumatology 55 years experience
History and physical: A history and physical is the most important test. You will need an examination to clarify the diagnosis and find out why raynaud's is present. We can see it by itself, in families or associated with a variety of illnesses inclduing connective tissue diseases. These diagnoses will require a variety of tests to look at these diagnoses.
A 45-year-old member asked:

What is the treatment for raynaud's phenomenon?

1 doctor answer6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Thomas Namey
Rheumatology 48 years experience
Warmth and CA-block: Keeping hands warm and dry is the thing everyone should do. I think in terms of drug prophylaxis or for diminution in severity of the raynaud's, calcium channel blockers are the best therapeutic option. I favor Diltiazem over verapamil (less constipation and slowing of heart rate), and over Nifedipine and amlodipine (less edema). However, all are fine and work. Others may use nitroglycerine paste.
A 25-year-old member asked:

What can cause raynaud's phenomenon?

2 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Betty Keller
Rheumatology 35 years experience
Cold and stress: We do not completely understand the cause of raynaud's, but exposure to cold and emotional stress cause spasm in the blood vessels of the hands and feet. This causes a reduction in blood flow. The lack of oxygen in the area cause the color to change to white, with continued lack of oxygen they turn blue and then red as the spasm resolves and blood flow returns.
CA
A 33-year-old member asked:

What is raynaud's?

3 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Robert Kwok
Pediatrics 33 years experience
Decreased blood flow: Raynaud's phenomenon is a symptom caused by constriction of small blood vessels, usually in the fingers and toes, leading to a lack of nutrients and oxygen going to the fingers and toes. Raynaud's phenomenon can be due to auto-immune disorders, hormonal imbalances, medication effects, etc... A primary care doctor, endocrinologist, or rheumatologist can evaluate a person with such symptoms.
A 30-year-old member asked:

Is raynaud's phenomenon common?

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. EVAN Leibowitz
Rheumatology 25 years experience
Yes: Raynauds is a hypersensitivity to the cold of the small vessels of the extremities (hands and feet). Most people with raynauds have no other disease associated with it. Occasionally raynauds is associated with an autoimmune disease.

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Last updated Jul 16, 2019
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