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A 46-year-old member asked:

what are the symptoms associated with raynaud's phenomenon?

1 doctor answer3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Michael Bolesta
Orthopedic Surgery 40 years experience
Pain: The fingers can turn red, white, blue, and this is painful. The sequence is often triggered by exposure to cold.

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A 39-year-old member asked:

Why should I see a doctor if you have a raynaud's vasospastic attack on just one side?

2 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Andras Perl
Internal Medicine 42 years experience
May be autoimmune: See a rheumatologist for work-up or exclusion of autoimmune disease.
A 31-year-old member asked:

What is the difference between chillblains and raynaud's disease?

3 doctor answers3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Robert Kwok
Pediatrics 33 years experience
Care is the same: The prevention and treatment of chilblains (pernio, perniosis) and raynaud's are similar. Chilblains are itchy, tender spots or bumps, with a reddish or purplish color. The blood vessels in chilblains are damaged (vasculitis). The cause is cold-damage to the tissue (basically getting frostbite on a spot of skin), so chilblains happens in cold weather or very cold water exposure.
CA
A 35-year-old member asked:

I have raynaud's and cold-induced urticaria. Does this put me at any greater risk for a stroke?

2 doctor answers8 doctors weighed in
Dr. Steven Machtinger
Allergy and Immunology 44 years experience
Yes: Raynaud's phenomenon is a vasospastic response of small blood vessels in the digits to external cold. It is a risk factor for stroke. You probably can't eliminate your cause of raynaud's as its ultimately genetic in origin. You can control other risk factors for stroke like cigarette smoking, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, and diabetes.
CA
A 24-year-old member asked:

Could raynaud's disease be only in index fingers?

2 doctor answers6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Robert Kwok
Pediatrics 33 years experience
Maybe: Raynaud's phenomenon is due to spasm of blood vessels supplying the fingers and toes. Finger symptoms usually involve all fingers. People vary in the symptoms they get with any disorder, so it is possible that a person could have symptoms in only index fingers. There may be malformations in the arteries going to the index fingers. A primary care or rheumatology doctor can help figure things out.
CA
A 40-year-old member asked:

I have raynaud's, what can I do to improve my circulation?

2 doctor answers6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Robert Kwok
Pediatrics 33 years experience
Avoid cold; try meds: Other than treating the underlying condition(s) causing raynaud's symptoms, avoiding emotional stress, keeping warm, not smoking, and avoiding caffeine, some medications can help. Nifedipine, diltiazem, losartan, and prazosin have been used in patients with raynaud's phenomenon, to block vasospasm and/or relax vessels so they can dilate to let more blood flow through them.

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Last updated Jun 29, 2014

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