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A 25-year-old member asked:

how big is the catheter used during esophageal manometry?

3 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Brett Kalmowitz
Gastroenterology 22 years experience
Small compared: With food that you typically eat and swallow and smaller then most endoscopes for traditional endoscopy. The manometry catheter is designed to go into the nose so it has to be small. However, some technicians will let you swallow the tube through the mouth which may make it easier. Worth asking....
Dr. Vivek Huilgol
Gastroenterology 35 years experience
HUGE...: Bigger than a rain gutter... No - seriously it is small enough to slip through your nostril and go down the back of your throat into your esophagus.
Dr. Jeffrey Ramkaransingh
Interventional Radiology 20 years experience
4 mm diameter: Esophageal manometry catheters are typically about 4 mm in diameter. They are long enough to travel from your nose, down the esophagus and into the stomach.

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A 21-year-old member asked:

If a person has an indwelling catheter in place long term because of incontinence, is irrigation indicated and if so, with what?

2 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Pedro Hernandez
Geriatrics 40 years experience
Not necessary: Irrigations are indicated only if you are treating a condition of the bladder like yeast in the bladder with anti fungal medications. Even though indwelling permanent catheters are a risk for infection is not common practice to irrigate.
A 21-year-old member asked:

I have barrett's esophagus, do I have a greater risk for cancer

2 doctor answers9 doctors weighed in
Dr. Brittany Chan
Dr. Brittany Chananswered
Pediatrics 10 years experience
Yes: Barrett's esophagus is associated with a higher risk of cancer, specifically esophageal adenocarcinoma. However, the risk is still low, and most people with this condition do not develop cancer (less than 1%). Caucasion males who smoke are classically the ones with the highest risk. http://digestive.niddk.nih.gov/ddiseases/pubs/barretts/#3.
A 21-year-old member asked:

Which, if any, catheter will be best for my child?

2 doctor answers7 doctors weighed in
Dr. Edward Evans
Neonatology 18 years experience
Depends: A catheter is a plastic tube. It can be placed in many different organs for many different purposes. You should discuss the specifics of your situation with your doctor. It is always better to not have a catheter if one is not needed as they are always an infection risk, however they are needed for care in many different medical conditions.
A 21-year-old member asked:

What follow-up care is necessary during recovery after surgery for esophageal cancer?

2 doctor answers7 doctors weighed in
Dr. Stephen Noga
Medical Oncology 34 years experience
Close followup: Both the surgeon, medical oncologist and radiation oncologist must be involved in your followup care. Depending on the stage, you may involve all 3 of these specialists who will mainly follow you by physical exams, ct scans and occasionally pet/ct scans.
A 30-year-old member asked:

Why does a heart rate go down after a catheter angiogram procedure?

2 doctor answers7 doctors weighed in
Dr. Shahin Tavackoli
Cardiology 23 years experience
Not true necessarily: I do angiograms almost on a daily basis. In the distant past, the contrast we used made the heart stop for a couple of seconds or would slow it down in some people (immediately after the injection); but that is a thing of the past anymore.

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Last updated Nov 28, 2017
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