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A 29-year-old member asked:

how do you reduce your chances of getting arthritis?

2 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. James Chen
Sports Medicine 15 years experience
Stay healthy & light: Many uncontrollable factors can contribute to developing osteoarthritis such as genetics, family history, trauma and injury. However many things can be controlled and prevented. The best things to do are to stay in excellent shape, stay thin, and have a good diet. Mix weight bearing and non-weightbearing (swimming, biking) activities rather than continuously pounding on the joints on hard pavement.
Dr. Tracy Lovell
Rheumatology 21 years experience
See below: Maintain a healthy weight and avoid injury.

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A 21-year-old member asked:

I want to try an alternative arthritis treatment. What's safe?

2 doctor answers2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Gregg Albers
Addiction Medicine 41 years experience
Arthritis: Alternative arthritis treatments, which are far more than can be mentioned in 400 letters, are often safe, but often ineffective. Glucosame has some positive effect on arthritis, but most are no better than placebo (help about 30% of those who try it). Most physicians do not recommend treatments that have no more benefit than a placebo, but most patients with arthritis try them anyway.
A 38-year-old member asked:

Does arthritis respond to medication or not?

3 doctor answers3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Barbara A Majeroni
Specializes in Family Medicine
Depends: There are different kinds of arthritis. Osteoarthritis is more common. Medications do not help the arthritis, but help manage the symptoms. In rheumatoid arthritis, there are medications that can help the arthritis and delay its progression. A rheumatologist is the best person to consult for this.
A 21-year-old member asked:

Does cracking your knuckles increase your arthritis risk?

2 doctor answers2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Barbara A Majeroni
Specializes in Family Medicine
No: Cracking your knuckles does not increase your risk for arthritis.
A 22-year-old member asked:

Does arthritis get worse the more you move?

2 doctor answers3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Marsha Davis
Internal Medicine 28 years experience
No: The more you move it should improve the pain from arthritis.
A 21-year-old member asked:

My mom has arthritis. Should I be worried about getting it too?

2 doctor answers2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Kenneth Adler
Family Medicine 40 years experience
Yes: Somewhat. Most people mean osteoarthritis when they refer to "arthritis." this is the most common form of arthrtiis. It is the "wear and tear" type of arthritis and can happen to anyone regardless of family history. However a family history does increase your risk. Exercise regularly, maintain a healthy weight, and avoid joint trauma to reduce your risk of getting osteoarthritis.

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Last updated Oct 4, 2016

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