A 34-year-old member asked:
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why would one have a sudden drop in emotion and inability to smile in social situations?

2 doctor answers
Dr. Pamela Pappas
41 years experience Psychiatry
Why?: I think you would be the best person to answer this question, because you're the one living your life. It may help to explore this with a counselor, therapist, or psychiatrist though, who is not involved in your personal life. Such professionals could listen impartially, without needing to get you to "change" what you are feeling. This could provide a space in which to discover yourself.
Answered on Jun 23, 2012
Dr. Andrew Berry
13 years experience Clinical Psychology
Desensitization: Start regularly socializing with small, and i mean small groups of people you know personally in a variety of social situations, and slowly increase the number of friends. Then, slowly have your friends invite people you may not know personally, just one or two to start with, and increase the numbers of known and unknown people over time. Should the anxiety spike, stick with smaller mixed groups o
Answered on Mar 11, 2015

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A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Pamela Pappas
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Yes: Yes, this is possible and can be part of autism spectrum disorders.

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