U.S. doctors online nowAsk doctors free
A 31-year-old member asked:

what is a good method to cure dry nostrils causing epistaxis, also known as nosebleeds?

2 doctor answers10 doctors weighed in
Dr. Nader Kalantar
ENT and Head and Neck Surgery 15 years experience
Ointment & saline: Keep nose moisturized with antibiotic ointment or Vaseline; place pea sized amount pressed with pad of thumb into each nostril twice daily. You can also use saline gel/sprays, and use a humidifier at home. Nosebleeds improve with these measures while avoiding picking or scratching in the nose. Consider seeing ENT if you do not improve.
Dr. Philip Rosenblum
Family Medicine 28 years experience
Saline gel: Saline nasal gel, there are several brands but generic is just fine, is probably the best, and most natural way to stop nosebleeds. Apply a small amount to each nostril at bedtime for a few nights in a row, then several nights a week to maintain. You should have much less trouble after that.

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

Ask doctors free
Personalized answers
Free
Talk to a doctor
$30 per visit with
membership

Similar questions

A 44-year-old member asked:

Is it common to have nosebleeds in pregnancy?

2 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Jan Rydfors
Obstetrics and Gynecology 34 years experience
Yes: Nosebleeds are very common in pregnancy. Many women will experience them for the first time while pregnant. They are due to an increase in blood vessels in your nasal lining caused by the increase in estrogen coming from your placenta. If you have a nose bleed, pinch the fleshy part of your nose for 5-15 minutes and tilt your head forward a little to minimize swallowing too much blood.
A 33-year-old member asked:

What causes nosebleeds in pregnancy?

2 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
Dr. David Fein
Specializes in Preventive Medicine
Fragile capillaries: Due to the high estrogen levels in pregnancy, the small blood vessels in our mucous membranes (nasal areas, oral areas) can become fragile and easily irritated --- which is why pregnant women may see nosebleeds or bleeding gums more frequently.
CA
A 34-year-old member asked about a member:

My 17 month old son is having nosebleeds. Should I be worried?

2 doctor answers3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Robert Kwok
Pediatrics 33 years experience
Look inside the nose: A normal toddler can have occasional, brief nosebleeds. Causes include colds or allergies that cause sniffling and mucous in the nose. Teaching a child to blow his nose while bathing can clear mucous. A bead or other toy put "up the nose" can cause bleeding, as can nasal trauma from bumping into things. If nosebleeding is heavy, or repeats for more than 2 days, one should talk with the doctor.
A 32-year-old member asked:

Should I be worried about getting a bloody nose a week after my tonsillectomy?

2 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Rodney Diaz
ENT and Head and Neck Surgery 22 years experience
Not usually: Not from nose itself. But if you had adenoidectomy with tonsillectomy, some risk for nose bleeds. If you are actively bleeding from nose or mouth after tonsillectomy, you should go to your surgeon's office or nearest er for evaluation right away.
A 40-year-old member asked:

Can nose sprays cause bloody nose?

3 doctor answers11 doctors weighed in
Dr. Ankush Bansal
Internal Medicine 17 years experience
Yes: Yes, especially steroid nasal sprays. They cause thinning of the mucosa and skin so it's easier for the underlying blood vessels to get disturbed and tear.

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

Ask doctors free
Personalized answers
Free
Talk to a doctor
$30 per visit with
membership
Last updated Oct 24, 2017

People also asked

Related topics

Connect with a U.S. board-certified doctor by text or video anytime, anywhere.
$30 per visit with
membership

Disclaimer:

Content on HealthTap (including answers) should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment, and interactions on HealthTap do not create a doctor-patient relationship. Never disregard or delay professional medical advice in person because of anything on HealthTap. Call your doctor or 911 if you think you may have a medical emergency.