A 22-year-old member asked:
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is it bad to drink cold water after you spent all night crying? i don't want to sound dumb. what are you supposed to and not supposrd to do.

2 doctor answers
Dr. Lance Anderson
24 years experience Psychiatry
Cold hides thirst: If somebody has been crying so hard to the point that they are dehydrated (either from tear flow, or drinking fluids and eating) replenishing hydration can be important. Cold water will start to replenish hydration, but it will take away thirst, sometimes too quickly. Room temperature water does not artificially hide thirst. Be sure to address the causes of the crying and feel better soon.
Answered on Sep 22, 2013
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Dr. Heidi Fowler
24 years experience Psychiatry
Water: Traditional Chinese medicine recommends room temperature water. But, frankly, you can drink any temp you like - except too hot.
Answered on Oct 21, 2018

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