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A 22-year-old male asked:

does hepatitis b go away on its own?

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. Enrique Molina
Gastroenterology 35 years experience
Not really: hepatitis B can be controlled by your immune system on its own, without ever requiring treatment, but the virus remains dormant in your liver and may re-activate if your immune system is compromised. Other times you do need treatment with meds to stop the inflammation in the liver and prevent cirrhosis, liver cancer

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A 21-year-old member asked:

Can there be complications with hepatitis a if I have diabetes?

2 doctor answers3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Shabbir Hossain
Internal Medicine 16 years experience
Medication related: Some diabetic meds are metabolized or work in the liver. If the hepatitis a affects your liver function, then it's ability to process those medications will be altered.
A 21-year-old member asked:

Can there be complications with hepatitis b if I am an alcoholic?

3 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Lance Stein
Specializes in Hepatology
Yes: All patients with chronic liver diseases need to be counseled to stop drinking. Alcohol will cause the liver damage from hepatitis b and hepatitis C to become more rapid. Two liver problems are always worse than one.
A 21-year-old member asked:

Where in the world is hepatitis b more prevalent?

2 doctor answers2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Lance Stein
Specializes in Hepatology
Asia, Eastern Europe: From the who website: hepatitis b is endemic in china and other parts of asia where 8-10% of the adult population are chronically infected. High rates of chronic infections are also found in the amazon and the southern parts of eastern and central europe. In the middle east and indian sub-continent, an estimated 2% to 5% of the general population is chronically infected.
A 35-year-old member asked:

Please tell me how long it takes for hepatitis b to go away on its own on average?

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. Meena Khandelwal
Obstetrics and Gynecology 35 years experience
Usually 4-12 weeks: Maximum 16 weeks.
West Palm Beach, FL
A 26-year-old female asked:

Hello i was just diagnosed with hepatitis b ,is there a treatment for me or can it naturally go away after awhile?

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. John Fung
General Surgery 39 years experience
Recheck in 6 months: For acute HBV infection, 80% of patients will become immune, the viral infection will resolve. In 20% of patients, the virus will persist, leading to a chronic carrier state. The timeline distinguishing acute from chronic is 6 months, in other words, if the HBV surface antigen persists after 6 months from onset of infection, the patient is labelled a chronic carrier. There is treatment for this.

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Last updated Jul 13, 2018

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