U.S. doctors online nowAsk doctors free
A 19-year-old female asked:

what are your thoughts on electroconvulsive therapy for treating mdd?

1 doctor answer3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Heidi Fowler
Psychiatry 25 years experience
It can be very: effective in the treatment of severe, recalcitrant depression. It is also a safe option for elderly patients who may not be able to tolerate antidepressant medications.

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

Ask doctors free
Personalized answers
Free
Talk to a doctor
$30 per visit with
membership

Similar questions

A 33-year-old member asked:

Which kind of memory is disrupted by electroconvulsive therapy?

2 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Joseph Quinn
Neurology 31 years experience
Short term memory.: Electroconvulsive therapy for depression has been given a scary reputation in movies, but it is actually an effective therapy which is appropriate in some cases of severe depression. Patients frequently have some memory loss surrounding the time of the procedure, and those memories are not recovered. However, electroconvulsive therapy is not thought to produce progressive memory loss.
Dr. James Fox
Dr. James Fox commented
Psychiatry 14 years experience
That is correct, it will not make it difficult for you to make new memories. Memory loss around the time of treatment is common and to be expected, as with other procedures in which anesthesia is used.
Dec 27, 2011
A 32-year-old member asked:

Can ect give you back interest in things?

2 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Ankush Bansal
Internal Medicine 17 years experience
Resetting brain: Ect is a controlled therapy in which electrical shocks are introduced into both temples to "reset' the brain. A brief seizure is induced to reset the brain. The hope is that the neurotransmitters in the brain will be released in the right ratios to "fix" depression. Loss of interest is one of the features of depression. It won't happen overnight but it might improve.
A 37-year-old member asked:

After electroconvulsive therapy can he tell me his experience?

1 doctor answer3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Steven Reidbord
Psychiatry 36 years experience
No: Ect is administered under anesthesia. The person is "asleep" at the time and cannot later report what the actual ECT was like. Also, ECT produces a grand mal seizure, so even without anesthesia, the person would not be conscious at the time. Of course, the person who received ECT could tell about his experience just before and after the treatment itself, and may appreciate your interest.
A 32-year-old member asked:

What is the experience of electroconvulsive therapy?

1 doctor answer3 doctors weighed in
Dr. James Fox
Psychiatry 14 years experience
Varies: Ect treats depression - about 60% of those who receive treatment are not depressed at the end of treatment. During the procedure, patient's are put to sleep and paralyzed for about 5 minutes. During this time, an electrical signal causes a seizure which lasts from 20 sec to 2 min. Upon waking, there is some disorientation lasting up to 15 to 30min. Memory loss depends on electrode placement.
A 32-year-old member asked:

What fluid did you drink after sct?

1 doctor answer3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Charles Cattano
Gastroenterology 39 years experience
Not alcohol!: Unless you are in an environment or daily perform activities that predispose to dehydration, when a doctor asks you to liberalize fluids he/she means for you to drink lots of water and non-sugary or non-salty drinks. That excludes: sodas, caffeinated products, alcohol, highly sweetened products, and even "sports" drinks.

Related questions

A 28-year-old member asked:
6 doctor answers17 doctors weighed in
A 40-year-old member asked:
2 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
A 37-year-old member asked:
1 doctor answer3 doctors weighed in
A 33-year-old member asked:
2 doctor answers6 doctors weighed in
A 29-year-old female asked:
1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

Ask doctors free
Personalized answers
Free
Talk to a doctor
$30 per visit with
membership
Last updated Sep 28, 2016
Connect with a U.S. board-certified doctor by text or video anytime, anywhere.
$30 per visit with
membership

Disclaimer:

Content on HealthTap (including answers) should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment, and interactions on HealthTap do not create a doctor-patient relationship. Never disregard or delay professional medical advice in person because of anything on HealthTap. Call your doctor or 911 if you think you may have a medical emergency.