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A 42-year-old member asked:

what do you advise if i'm scheduled to have a cardiac ablation tomorrow, but not in afib right now?

2 doctor answers3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Wade Fletcher
Internal Medicine 22 years experience
GET THE ABLATION: PAROXYSMAL AFIB (IN AND OUT) CARRIES AT LEAST THE SAME STROKE RISK AS PERMANENT AFIB, AND IS OFTEN MORE SYMPTOMATIC. IF OTHER METHODS TO RATE CONTROL YOUR AFIB OR KEEP YOU FROM GOING IN AND OUT HAVE NOT BEEN SUCCESSFUL (AS I ASSUME THEY HAVEN'T), ABLATION IS A VERY SUCCESSFUL PROCEDURE BEING DONE MORE FREQUENTLY. THE FIB PATHWAYS CAN BE INDUCED IN THE LAB, IF NECESSARY, AT THE TIME OF PROCEDURE
Dr. Lance Berger
Cardiology 31 years experience
Talk to your doctor: Assuming you are being abated for AFib, and you have had recurrences despite medications, then it may be a good sign. The success rates are higher for "paroxysmal" AFib than permanent. If you have concerns, then this is a good time for a second opinion.

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Last updated Aug 10, 2014
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