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A 31-year-old member asked:

Why would a patient in renal failure get decreased cardiac output?

2 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Bennett Werner
Cardiology 45 years experience
They wouldn't: But the reverse is true. Someone with low cardiac output underperfuses the kidneys and commonly gets "pre-renal azotemia" which is a form of poor kidney function. People with advanced renal failure are commonly volume overloaded which is often mistakenly called "heart failure" (really it's circulation failure). Is that what you mean?
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Dr. Robert Vogt Lowell
Specializes in Pediatric Cardiology
Complex: Even though the mechanisms are complex, one way to understand is that if you lose the ability to filter your blood and eliminate extra fluid from your body (one of the kidney's main functions) your heart will be burdened with pumping a lot more blood than it was intended to do and will therefore fatigue and not pump as well (same as any other muscle would if forced to work "overtime").
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Similar questions

A 35-year-old member asked:

Why does a patient in renal failure have decreased cardiac output?

2 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Kevin Lingle
Cardiology 16 years experience
Not always related: Renal failure in and of itself is not realted to cardiac output, there are many things that can cause both renal failure and decreased cardiac output, but they are not always related. However if someone has really low cardiac output, one could develop renal failure b/c not enough blood is getting to the kidneys.
Created for people with ongoing healthcare needs but benefits everyone.
A 43-year-old member asked:

For what reasons might a patient in renal failure have decreased cardiac output?

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. Gerald Neuberg
Cardiology 39 years experience
Direct vs. indirect: Kidney failure can weaken the heart muscle (uremic cardiomyopathy), but this is pretty rare. A more common problem is fluid accumulation around the heart (pericardial efffusion), which can literally choke the heart (tamponade) but improves with extra dialysis. Or, more likely, the conditions that caused the kidney disease (commonly hypertension and/or diabetes) also are causing heart problems.
Created for people with ongoing healthcare needs but benefits everyone.
Last updated Dec 8, 2019
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