A 45-year-old member asked:
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what is the life expectancy with a cardiac transplant patient in renal failure?

1 doctor answer
Dr. Steven Ajluni
35 years experience Cardiology
Cardiac transplant: Transplant survival rates have been improving over the past several years as better options exist in preventing rejection (better than 60% live 10 or more years). Diffuse post-transplant coronary arteriopathy tends to or relate more with late post-transplant events. Coexistant renal failure would also be a negative predictor on survival irrespective of transplant status (mortality 50% at 2 yrs).
Answered on Sep 22, 2018

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