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A 34-year-old member asked:

How can you reduce your own snoring?

5 doctor answers12 doctors weighed in
Dr. Phil Zapanta
ENT and Head and Neck Surgery 21 years experience
Several tips: No muscle relaxants, alcohol, & sleeping aids prior to sleep; improve nasal airflow by using a decongestant (oral or topical - if these work, though, you can't use these otc meds indefinitely. You will need to be evaluated by an ent) or breathe-right strips; avoid sleeping on your back. If you find that you are snoring & having fatigue during the day, you might have sleep apnea. You should see ent.
Dr. Robert Knox
ENT and Head and Neck Surgery 37 years experience
Snoring: Snoring is about airway blockage, generally with mouth breathing. Anything that plugs your nose may lead to airway blockage and mouth breathing with snoring. Blockage anyplace else, such as the soft palate, big tonsils, and an enlarge tongue, may also contribute. If snoring is bothering the person you sleep with, or is interrupting your sleep quality, go see your doctor. A sleep study will help.
Dr. Michelle Zetoony
Sleep Medicine 18 years experience
Quick solutions: There are a few quick solutions to reduce snoring. One is try breathing better through nose: sinus rinse, nose spray or treating allergy symptoms. The next is positioning. So avoiding sleeping on your back (this is related to gravity). Devices can help: theravent, mouth piece (like silent night appliance), or breath right strips. There are more invasive: surgery.
Dr. Mark Birnbach
Cosmetic Dentistry 48 years experience
Sleep apnea: Some people snore more on their backs, so avoid that. Some people have deviated septums or enlarged tonsil and adenoids which block the airway. Having these conditions corrected can help. Wearing a dental device that brings the lower jaw forward while sleeping can open the airway at the back of the throat , reducing the turbulence around the uvula that causes snoring.
Dr. John Feola
Internal Medicine 31 years experience
R/O OSA: OSA can be suggested by history and physical. Excess snoring/daytime sleepiness/apneic episodes/ aM headaches. And the Exam obesity/small oral airway/collar size>18. The definitive test is a PSG with split night/CPAP titration. I would request copy of sleep study and get a second opinion if you are not satisfied with the options. You are young CPAP can be difficult to tolerate. ENT FOR UPP EVA

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A 42-year-old member asked:

What can I do to stop snoring or reduce it?

2 doctor answers3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Matthew Hyde
Dentistry 41 years experience
Sleep Study: You should get a sleep study done either at a sleep study center(best) or have your doctor order at home sleep study (as long as it has some form of positional monitoring) to get an accurate diagnosis first.

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Last updated Oct 18, 2015

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