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A 42-year-old member asked:

what is the difference between passive and passive aggressive behavior?

1 doctor answer6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Glen Elliott
Child Psychiatry 43 years experience
Effect on others: Passive behaviors simply mean that individuals rarely take initiative but may let others suggest or, more often, do for them. Passive aggressve individuals choose not to do things as a way of inconveniencing or punishing others--the results of their inactions produce trouble for those from whom they often have sought help.

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A 19-year-old member asked:

Passive aggressive behavior how to cope with it...?

2 doctor answers12 doctors weighed in
Dr. K. Olson
Dr. K. Olsonanswered
Psychiatry 39 years experience
Keep your center: Not really. Strictly defined it is a manner of expressing anger or hostility indirectly - in such a manner that it is hard to identify or get the person to admit to. One often feels put down, attacked or hurt. Those who are not assertive can express themselves this way - they are not vulnerable and it keeps others at bay (maybe so they won't be hurt themselves). Underneath may be heart of gold.
A 44-year-old member asked:

Can someone describe passive aggressive behavior for me?

1 doctor answer5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Glen Elliott
Child Psychiatry 43 years experience
Interaction style: Passive/aggressive behavior is a way some react when asked to do something they do not really like but believe they cannot outright refuse to do. Instead, they have a negative attitude, "forget" to carry out tasks, or make careless mistakes. They often are critical of authority & alternate between outright hostility & contrition. If chronic, it is called passive-aggressive personality disorder.
A 32-year-old member asked:

What does it mean to have passive/aggressive behavior?

1 doctor answer6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Glen Elliott
Child Psychiatry 43 years experience
An interaction style: Passive/aggressive behavior is a way some deal with others when asked to do something they do not really like but believe they cannot outright refuse to do. Instead, they have a negative attitude and "forget" to carry our tasks while being critical of authority and alternating between outright hostility and contrition. If chronic, it is called passive-aggressive personality disorder.
A 48-year-old member asked:

Can someone explain and give examples of passive-aggressive behavior?

1 doctor answer6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Pamela Pappas
Psychiatry 42 years experience
Passive-aggressive: This is a pattern of indirectly expressing -- rather than directly addressing -- negative emotions such as anger. The person might overtly agree to a task, but then miss deadlines, show up late to meetings, not answer phone calls, etc. Making excuses, procrastinating, sullen attitude, and complaining about feeling unappreciated can be other signs. This can be very problematic in organizations.
CA
A 33-year-old male asked:

What is the definition or description of: Passive aggressive behavior?

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. Terri Faith
Clinical Psychology 14 years experience
Passive aggression: Passive Aggression can sometimes be caused by the inability to say no. For example, if you are a people pleaser and say yes when you want to say no, you will feel inwardly resentful and this can lead to future outbursts of anger. Feelings of resentment and anger are pushed down or ignored for a while and so are forced to surface when triggered later on in time.

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Last updated Oct 3, 2016

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