U.S. doctors online nowAsk doctors free
A 46-year-old member asked:

Could fluoride in drinking water prevent tooth decay?

4 doctor answers13 doctors weighed in
Dr. Theodore Davantzis
Dentistry 41 years experience
Absolutely !: Together with eating healthy and proper oral hygiene, as well as regular visits to your dentist. Every little bit helps !
Created for people with ongoing healthcare needs but benefits everyone.
Dr. Gary Sandler
Dentistry 55 years experience
Public fluoridation: It can't necessarily guarantee it, but it could certainly make your teeth stronger and less likely to develop caries (tooth decay). This along with proper tooth brushing, flossing and a diet that does not promote tooth decay will all aid in preventing tooth decay and a healthy mouth.
Created for people with ongoing healthcare needs but benefits everyone.
Dr. Paul Grin
Pain Management 37 years experience
Of course: "Since 1950, the ADA has unreservedly endorsed the fluoridation of community water supplies as safe, effective, and necessary in preventing tooth decay."
Created for people with ongoing healthcare needs but benefits everyone.
Dr. John Thaler
Prosthodontics 42 years experience
Yes: Plenty of studies and literature on this. One of the most positive things to happen in the last 60 years for the prevention of tooth decay.
Created for people with ongoing healthcare needs but benefits everyone.
Dr. Robert Goldenberg
Dentistry 53 years experience
FLORIDA was discovered in a small southern town where everybody had brown Mottled teethvbut no decay. It had a very high concentration of fluoride something like eight parts per million or maybe more. One part per million in the drinking water is now the standard and effectively helps to control tooth decay
Jun 2, 2015
Last updated Jun 28, 2015

Disclaimer:

Content on HealthTap (including answers) should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment, and interactions on HealthTap do not create a doctor-patient relationship. Never disregard or delay professional medical advice in person because of anything on HealthTap. Call your doctor or 911 if you think you may have a medical emergency.