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A 21-year-old member asked:

Does smoking cause breast fibrocystic breast disease?

2 doctor answers3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Barry Rosen
General Surgery 35 years experience
Maybe: Studies have been contradictory regarding the relationship between smoking and fibrocystic changes. Periductal mastitis and subareolar abscesses are associated with cigarette smoking.
Dr. Regina Hampton
Breast Surgery 24 years experience
No: All breasts are fibrocystic but many will not have symptoms beyond the normal menstrual cycle.

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A 40-year-old member asked:

Can you tell me about fibrocystic breast disease and its causes?

1 doctor answer4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Kathryn Wagner
General Surgery 32 years experience
Fibrocystic breasts: Cause is the normal fluctuation of monthly hormones and about 70% of women have it. It is the cystic dilatation of the milk ducts prior to menses after ovulation that produces the cysts and tenderness mostly. Goes away usually after menopause if no hormones are taken.

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Last updated Apr 9, 2018
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