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Wisdom teeth deglutition

A 19-year-old male asked:
Dr. Theodore Davantzis
40 years experience Dentistry
Yes....: ... for s short period of time, sometimes lasting a week or so.
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Dr. Louis Gallia
45 years experience Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
Yes: Yes, should go away soon. If still present at a week, see oral surgeon

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A 23-year-old female asked:
Dr. Michael Turner
37 years experience Family Medicine
It depends: Excessive saliva is typically a transient problem and rarely a cause for concern. Most likely either your salivary glands are making more saliva than ... Read More
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1 thank
Dr. Arnold Malerman
53 years experience Orthodontics
Saliva: An increase in saliva production is commonly associated with tooth eruption. Typically infants that are teething drool a lot. Trouble out other poss ... Read More
A 25-year-old female asked:
Dr. Daniel Rubenstein
51 years experience Dentistry
No: Removal of wisdom teeth should have no negative effects on chewing or swallowing. If you are having problems swallowing, make an appointment for an ex ... Read More
A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. Debi Williams
26 years experience Dentistry
Depends: If you are having trouble swallowing hours after an extraction you need to call your dentist, especially if you were sedated. It is normal for swelli ... Read More
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1 comment
A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. Gary Sandler
54 years experience Dentistry
Trouble swallowing: Difficulty in swallowing following wisdom tooth extraction could be from swelling of the tissues as a result of the surgical procedure or an infection ... Read More
A 39-year-old member asked:
Dr. Gary Sandler
54 years experience Dentistry
Not really but: Things do feel funny and unnatural while you are numb and expect some soreness and swelling as well. Some may say they 'have trouble swallowing' but i ... Read More
A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. John Thaler
41 years experience Prosthodontics
Not usually: Dry sockets result from the loss of the blood clot forming in the hole where the tooth was. Anything that will disrupt, dislodge, rupture, loosen or b ... Read More
A 31-year-old female asked:
Dr. Theodore Davantzis
40 years experience Dentistry
Dry Socket: A dry socket occurs when the blood clot that formed in the extraction site is dislodged. This can occur with almost any action that disturbs the site. ... Read More
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1 thank
A 31-year-old member asked:
Dr. Charles Lockhart
9 years experience Dentistry
Not usually: Dry socket is the rejection of a blood clot which occurs with smoking or negative pressure as sucking on a straw. Swallowing should not contribute, b ... Read More
A 21-year-old female asked:
Dr. Robert Killian
28 years experience General Practice
Call dentist: You are giving a post op complication. Please sign off of the internet and phone your dentist for instructions.

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