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wisdom teeth blood clot white

A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. Theodore Davantzis
40 years experience Dentistry
Yes: A dark red color to be exact.
Dr. Joseph Wineman
40 years experience Dentistry
Clot color: Following an extraction the clot is formed from the blood that coagulates in the socket. So yes, it will be reddish in color.

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A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jennifer McAroy
17 years experience Dentistry
Clotting: The clot may not fall out. Tissue migrates over clot and causes the socket to heal.
Dr. Joel Doyon
36 years experience Cosmetic Dentistry
Yes and no: If the clots are coming out, you should be having severe pain in the extraction sites. If you don't have pain, you are probably just flushing out som ... Read More
A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Earl Sandroff
43 years experience Dentistry
Same as other clots: A blood clot from almost anywhere in the body will be bright red or blood colored. If it has been exposed to the air for a period of time it will be d ... Read More
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Dr. Richard Charmoy
36 years experience Dentistry
Dark red: A blood clot over the area where a wisdom tooth has been removed is dark red.
A 34-year-old member asked:
Dr. Steven Koos
21 years experience Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
Highly unlikely: This usually happens within the first several days. The lack of a disrupted clot to reform can lead to the development of a dry socket, but the incid ... Read More
A female asked:
Dr. Gary Sandler
54 years experience Dentistry
Initial coverage: Approximately 1 to 3 weeks for initial coverage of tissue, although it actually takes about 6 to 8 weeks for the socket to completely fill in with bon ... Read More
A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Theodore Davantzis
40 years experience Dentistry
Time: You'll need to give your cheek some time to heal. The blood clot needs to be resorbed by your body.
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A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Daniel Rubenstein
51 years experience Dentistry
Blood clot: If you are having no pain, keep the area clean and free of debris, as per the post-op instructions from your oral surgeon. If you are having increase ... Read More
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A 17-year-old female asked:
Dr. Gary Sandler
54 years experience Dentistry
Ext socket: It could be food or normal healing tissue. As long as there is no pain or swelling it should heal on its own uneventfully. Rinse out as well as you ca ... Read More
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A 31-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jennifer McAroy
17 years experience Dentistry
Socket: If the socket is open and no clot has formed, this could become painful. Watch for pain and an odor on your breath. If this occurs, it could be dry ... Read More
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A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Russell Lieblick
21 years experience Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
Yes : First the clot becomes the scaffolding for healing, then the clot is resorbed as bone grows back into the socket.
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2 thanks

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