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whats the difference between cellulitis and mrsa

A 50-year-old member asked:
Dr. M. Christine Lee
27 years experience Dermatology
Drug resistance: Cellulitis is an infection (usually staph) of the fat underneath the skin and can initially involve a small area on the hand or foot but then spread v ... Read More

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A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. Vadim Glukh
22 years experience Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Surgery
It could be: Cellulitis is a complex clinical picture of infection which could be caused among others by the mrsa.
A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Daniel Lee
25 years experience Internal Medicine
No: Mrsa stands for methicillin-resistant staph aureus, which is a name of a specific bacteria which can cause cellulitis. Cellulitis is an infection of ... Read More
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A 56-year-old member asked:
Dr. Martin Raff
55 years experience Infectious Disease
Common: Usually cellulitis is due predominantly to strep, but staph may also be involved. Mrsa is more prone to produce "boils" and can be persistent and rec ... Read More
A 50-year-old member asked:
Dr. Rajesh Rethnam
22 years experience Pulmonary Critical Care
Big difference: Cellulitis is just infection of skin. Sepsis is if that infection goes to blood and produce chemicals affecting other organs.
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A 51-year-old member asked:
Dr. Robert Dorsey
35 years experience Wound care
Not much: Cellulitis is caused by multiple different bacteria. Mrsa is the most common bacteria causing cellulitis.
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A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. Joel Gallant
35 years experience Infectious Disease
Cause/effect: A boil is an abscess--a collection of pus caused by a bacterial infection. Mrsa (methicillin-resistant staph. Aureus) is a type of bacteria that ofte ... Read More
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A 38-year-old female asked:
Dr. Diane Minich
36 years experience Family Medicine
Spelling: the same group or genus of bacteria.
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A 31-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mike Moore
7 years experience Family Medicine
Types of Bugs: Mrsa or methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus is a bacteria which can cause severe skin infections that are resistant to the usual antibiotics w ... Read More
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7 thanks
A 55-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jeffery Dormu
22 years experience Vascular Surgery
Veins: Phlebitis is related to inflamation in the veins. It usually occurs in the superficial system in the legs. This is different from an infection which ... Read More
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A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Antoanella Calame
18 years experience Dermatology
Boil vs Acne: Acne is a skin condition that occurs when your hair follicles become plugged with oil and dead skin cells.A boil is a skin infection that starts in a ... Read More
A 30-year-old female asked:
Dr. Clarence Lyons
19 years experience Family Medicine
Difference: Staph is a bacterial infection and herpes comes from a virus.
A 34-year-old member asked:
Dr. Anatoly Belilovsky
34 years experience Pediatrics
Staph infections...: ...Including MRSA are more invasive than diaper rash, with more swelling and skin destruction, sometimes bubbling, sometimes pus.
A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Martin Raff
55 years experience Infectious Disease
Herpes simplex: Herpes is a virus. Folliculitis starts when hair follicles are damaged by friction from clothing, an insect bites, blockage of the follicle, shaving, ... Read More
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A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Hesham Hassaballa
21 years experience Pulmonary Critical Care
Definitions: "Bacteremia" means "bacteria in the blood." "Septicemia" is an older term for what we now call "severe sepsis" or "septic shock." Severe sepsis or se ... Read More
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A 54-year-old member asked:
Dr. William Walsh
16 years experience Addiction Medicine
Acinetobacter : Acinetobacter is a bacteria that is ubiquitous and usually doesn't cause infection. It is what we call opportunistic - it will cause infection if it ... Read More
A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. Tsu-Yi Chuang
49 years experience Dermatology
Shallow and deep: Erysipelas is a shallow infection usually only to dermis and cellulitis involving deeper tissue like fat (adipose tissue).
A female asked:
Dr. Donald Colantino
60 years experience Internal Medicine
Difference: Septicemia refers to infection-usually bacterial- involving the bloodstream( blood poisoning). Pneumonic pertains to the lung.
A 52-year-old member asked:
Dr. Gutti Rao
Dr. Gutti Rao answered
45 years experience Hospital-based practice
Abscess: Abscess- infection of subcutaneous tissue or organ>1cm pusutle is a tiny abscess. A furuncle is an infection of hair follicle, can become an abscess i ... Read More
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A 51-year-old member asked:
Dr. Linda Spencer
35 years experience Dermatology
Virus vs. bacterium: Herpes infections are caused by a virus, while carbuncles are caused by bacteria. Herpes infections appear as tiny, clear, painful blisters, while car ... Read More
A 39-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jeffrey Kass
27 years experience Podiatry
The resistance: Mrsa = methicillin resistant staph aureus vrsa = vancomycin resistant staph aureus.
A 50-year-old member asked:
Dr. Theodore Davantzis
39 years experience Dentistry
Infection: An abscess in an infection, TMJ dysfunction is not due to an infection.
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A 30-year-old member asked:
Dr. Robert Kwok
32 years experience Pediatrics
Impetigo = bacterial: Ringworm (tinea corporis) is a fungal infection and can spread to other parts of the body or to other people. Treatment is usually with over-the-count ... Read More
A 37-year-old female asked:
Dr. Joel Gallant
35 years experience Infectious Disease
Both used for teeth: They're completely different antibiotics from unrelated classes, with activity against different bacteria. Clindamycin treats staph and anaerobic bac ... Read More

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