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what pain drugs are safe with diverticulitis

A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mark Hoepfner
38 years experience General Surgery
Active or resolving?: With active diverticulitis on antibiotics, want to eat smaller and easy to digest foods, avoid heavy meals. As you heal you need to increase fiber in ... Read More
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A 36-year-old male asked:
Dr. Geoffrey Rutledge
40 years experience Internal Medicine
The non drug treatments for Diverticulitis include:: Diet changes, Increase fiber in diet, Supportive care, Surgery, Bowel resection.
A 29-year-old male asked:
Dr. Heidi Fowler
24 years experience Psychiatry
Movicol: It looks like long-term use isn't usually recommended.
A male asked:
Dr. Faiz Shakir
14 years experience Gastroenterology
Unfortunately no: But avoiding constipation with high fiber diet/good water intake and/or use of stool softeners may help.
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A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. Kevin Griffiths
Specializes in Nephrology and Dialysis
Tylenol (acetaminophen): If you have kidney disease, nsaids like alleve and Advil can further worsen your kidney disease or increase your blood pressure. Therefore these medi ... Read More
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A 30-year-old male asked:
Dr. Andrew Germanovich
12 years experience Pain Management
Risk of Death: 16000 people made this mistake last year and died. Alcohol is a luxury not a necessity, stop using it if you're on chronic pain meds.
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A 56-year-old member asked:
Dr. Peter Kurzweil
49 years experience Internal Medicine
2 problems: Acute diverticulitis is commonly treated with antibiotic such as Flagyl and clindamycin, effective against anaerobic (lack of oxygen areas) bacteria. ... Read More
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A 30-year-old member asked:
Dr. Frank Mayo
47 years experience Pulmonary Critical Care
Nitrates/tylenol: Eds pts should avoid nitrates when using eds drugs such as viagra. Children are usually given tylenol (acetaminophen) based on safety over many years. ... Read More
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A female asked:
Dr. Matthew Rauen
14 years experience Ophthalmology
Diabetic : Diabetic retinopathy comes in many forms. In general, I do not advise stopping of nsaids or Aspirin in patients with diabetic retinopathy (some of th ... Read More
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A 25-year-old male asked:
Dr. James Lin
Dr. James Lin answered
50 years experience Urology
Here are some...: Colonoscopy can usually & safely be done under brief IV sedation, but can be deferred until severe electrolyte imbalance+heart disease are optimal ... Read More
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A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Edward Hellman
28 years experience Orthopedic Surgery
Potentially: There are many foods and supplements with have tremendous antiinflammatory capabilities. You can read about anti-inflammatory diets in general and th ... Read More
A 44-year-old female asked:
Dr. Lois Freisleben-Cook
40 years experience Pediatrics
Biliary dyskinesia: carries a significant risk for serious consequences such as acalculous cholecystitis and should be teated under the guidance of your primary care phys ... Read More
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A 74-year-old female asked:
Dr. Bennett Werner
43 years experience Cardiology
Ginger: Ginger is effective for nausea - it has no beneficial or harmful effects on the heart and no activity in relieving pain. Here is what the National Ins ... Read More
A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Paul Grin
Dr. Paul Grin answered
35 years experience Pain Management
Tylenol (acetaminophen) : is a gold standard. No NSAIDs!
A 51-year-old member asked:
Dr. Barbara Stark Baxter
41 years experience Allergy and Immunology
NSAID allergy: Voltaren (diclofenac) is a member of the group of anti-inflammatory medications called non-steroidals. Some patients with reactions to these react to ... Read More
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A 81-year-old male asked:
Dr. John Munshower
29 years experience Family Medicine
Several: There are many pain medications that are not narcotic or opiate medication. The NSAID class for example may help, Acetaminophen may help, anti-spasmo ... Read More
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A 35-year-old female asked:
Dr. Alan Wartenberg
48 years experience Addiction Medicine
Neonatal abstinence: syndrome is the major pregnancy complication. Women taking opioids for pain are also passing it along to the fetus, and depending on a variety of fac ... Read More
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A 32-year-old female asked:
Dr. Adam King
Dr. Adam King answered
14 years experience Internal Medicine and Pediatrics
Tylenol (acetaminophen): Tylenol (acetaminophen) is your best bet. It's very safe, easy on your kidneys and the placenta. Keep hydrated, get extra rest. I hope you feel bette ... Read More
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A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. Andrew Kaplan
33 years experience Cardiology
Nitrate therapy: Typically, pain due to angina or a reduced blood flow to a region of the heart, is relieved in the short term with sublingual nitroglycerin. Both tabl ... Read More
A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ron Jones
Dr. Ron Jones answered
44 years experience Family Medicine
Depends on Cause: Entirely depends upon cause of the pain. Cannot even get close to an answer without further information.
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A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ronald Krauser
51 years experience Rheumatology
Impossible to say: This question needs to be addressed to your own doctors. You provide no specifics but there is no possible way that any doctor who does not participat ... Read More
A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alvin Stein
59 years experience Pain Management
Identify the causes: If you treat pain as a symptom and treat the symptom you treat the patient forever and they never get well. You need someone willing and able to id ... Read More
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A 63-year-old male asked:
Dr. Bac Nguyen
22 years experience Family Medicine
Take after meal: This med should be taken after your meal..Don't take it before as it can cause nausea and stomach upset etc...Also, you may need to take a smaller dos ... Read More
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A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alan Wartenberg
48 years experience Addiction Medicine
Too long a list: but it is not that they aren't compatible with methadone, but rather that they may interfere with its metabolism, either increasing or decreasing meth ... Read More

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

Ask doctors free
Personalized answers
Free
Talk to a doctor
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