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what could happen if cymbalta mixed with alcohol

A 54-year-old member asked:
Dr. Matt Vukin
15 years experience Psychiatry
Variable: Alcohol can potentiate side effects of your medications. This is might effect one person more severely than another. The combo of alcohol and Cymbal ... Read More
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A 50-year-old member asked:
Dr. Shariq Refai
12 years experience Psychiatry
Never a good idea.: never a good idea to mix any medications with alcohol.
A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Heidi Fowler
24 years experience Psychiatry
Not a good idea: Taking cymbalta (duloxetine) and drinking alcohol can increase risk of liver damage.
A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. Heidi Fowler
24 years experience Psychiatry
Please don't.: Taking alcohol with Cymbalta (duloxetine) can increase risk of liver damage.
A 50-year-old member asked:
Dr. Paul Cohen
27 years experience Family Medicine
Potential seizure: Any alcoholic beverage has the potential to interact with medications used to manage epilepsy in a negative way; usually by lowering the seizure thres ... Read More
A 52-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ajay Acharya
36 years experience Internal Medicine
Potentiate: Each will potentiate the other.
A 39-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alan Ali
Dr. Alan Ali answered
31 years experience Psychiatry
Alcohol: Excess sedation, confusion at high dose.
A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Pamela Pappas
41 years experience Psychiatry
Addiction & death: Mixing Cocaine with heroin is generally referred to as a "speedball" -- and is extremely addictive. Using benzodiazepines such as xanax (alprazolam) ... Read More
A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. Howard Gurr
39 years experience Clinical Psychology
Anxiety meds: I was not sure what you meant when you asked about mixing anxiety meds with "drugs". So, I will take both roads. For prescription medications, I woul ... Read More
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A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jeffrey Roth
42 years experience Addiction Medicine
Depressants: Barbiturates are central nervous system suppressants like alcohol. The major difference is that they do not have many of the other systemic effects o ... Read More
A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Heidi Fowler
24 years experience Psychiatry
It's like a : Molotov cocktail for the brain. Reckless. Dangerous. Irresponsible.
A 51-year-old member asked:
Dr. David Rosenfeld
26 years experience Pain Management
Sedation: You can be sedated. If both are prescribed to you it is fine.
A 51-year-old female asked:
Dr. David Sneid
40 years experience Endocrinology
You'll become poorer: As you spend money for otc medication that hasn't ever been shown to help any known medical condition. Alcohol in moderation won't hurt you or interac ... Read More
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A 55-year-old member asked:
Dr. Kevin Passer
34 years experience Child Psychiatry
It Depends: It depends on how much you take. Chlorpromazine, aka thorazine (chlorpromazine) is an antipsychotic/neuroleptic medication. It causes many side effect ... Read More
A 54-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ajay Acharya
36 years experience Internal Medicine
Find it out: You can find it out yourself........
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A 56-year-old member asked:
Dr. Caroline Cribari
22 years experience Psychiatry
ETOH&antidepressants: Mixing these is very dangerous. With antidepressant meds, your brain will experience twice the effect for every drink... Drink 1 glass > brain exp ... Read More
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A 37-year-old female asked:
Dr. Carla Enriquez
49 years experience Pediatrics
Unclear question: Street drugs may impact liver function, depending on drug, route used and hygiene. They can also impact nutrition and general health. Since you may ha ... Read More
A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Francis
Specializes in Pain Management
Yes, stupid: First off, do not do either for sleep. Look at your overall life situation. Are you stressed, overweight, drinking coffee or other caffeinated beve ... Read More
A 39-year-old female asked:
Dr. Alan Wartenberg
48 years experience Addiction Medicine
Don't know: Feeling short-of-breath (dyspnea) can result from a number of thinks involving the heart and lungs, but also can relate to anxiety. Some people are v ... Read More
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A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Holly Maes
35 years experience Pediatrics
Don't exceed 3000: You have to be very cautious because Acetaminophen overdose can be silent until lots of damage is done to your liver. You should not exceed 3000mg of ... Read More
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A 39-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michelle King
25 years experience Psychiatry
Geodon (ziprasidone): and other medications and grapefruit compete for an enzyme in the liver, similar to a drug-drug interaction. This is why while taking geodon (ziprasid ... Read More
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A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. John Chiu
Dr. John Chiu answered
56 years experience Allergy and Immunology
Not uncommon: People with rosacea flush with alcohol intake as would be many Asians. The former is due to an inflammatory response to an increase in temperature, th ... Read More
A member asked:
Dr. Mark Reynolds
32 years experience Psychiatry
No: Your doctor is correct, the best answer is no. Alcohol, seroquel (quetiapine) and valium all can be quite sedating. Combining them can have an additiv ... Read More
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1 thank

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

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