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what are the chances of getting cancer from a CT scan with and withous contrast in your

A 33-year-old female asked:
Dr. Ed Friedlander
43 years experience in Pathology
Negligible: The risk is theoretical and is too small to measure. You get plenty of radiation from cosmic rays; you don't see the scaremongers lining their homes w ... Read More

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A 38-year-old male asked:
Dr. Stephen Southard
14 years experience in Internal Medicine
Odds are good: MRI with MRCP is quite sensitive and specific. There is limited head to head data regarding to the two techniques of MRI/MRCP and EUS - though MRI/MR ... Read More
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A 52-year-old male asked:
Dr. Gurmukh Singh
48 years experience in Pathology
See below: If the colonoscopy was done properly, you are very unlikely to have colon cancer 20 months after the procedure. For good health - Have a diet rich in ... Read More
A 36-year-old male asked:
Dr. Le Wang
Dr. Le Wang answered
35 years experience in Internal Medicine
Very small: Very small if not zero. Can be negleted with once ct chest. Ct scans may slightly increase the risk of developing cancer with accumulating doses. Th ... Read More
A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Arnold Beresh
40 years experience in Podiatry
Minimal: Ct scans emit minimal radiation.
A 27-year-old male asked:
Dr. Stevwn Schneider
38 years experience in Neurosurgery
Overall mri better: It depends whether or not the scan was done with contrast. Chances are low that anything large was missed although smaller lesions go unseen from time ... Read More
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A 46-year-old male asked:
Dr. Michael Gabor
32 years experience in Diagnostic Radiology
Chest CT radiation: exposure depends on the type of chest CT performed. Total effective dose for a "standard" Chest CT is about 7mSv. The theoretical increased lifetime c ... Read More
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A 55-year-old male asked:
Dr. Michael Gabor
32 years experience in Diagnostic Radiology
It depends: It depends what they are looking for. It is common to perform a spine MRI without/with contrast. If you had prior back surgery, it will help differe ... Read More
A 27-year-old female asked:
Dr. Peter Ihle
53 years experience in Orthopedic Surgery
No: The dye as it's called is gadolinium and it shows up and gives very good outline of the areas studied with no scatter artifact. It is excreted fairly ... Read More
A 52-year-old member asked:
Dr. Barry Rosen
33 years experience in General Surgery
Other Way Around: The best cts are done with contrast: IV dye for eval. Of blood vessels & blood flow; oral dye to better see the intestines. Rarely, no contrast is bet ... Read More
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A 35-year-old female asked:
Dr. Robert Kwok
32 years experience in Pediatrics
Can't get rid of it: The radiation from the CT machine's x-ray beam is there when turned on and not there when turned off. Imagine a light switch in a bathroom... turn in ... Read More
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A 53-year-old female asked:
Dr. Michael Gabor
32 years experience in Diagnostic Radiology
If it just: has thin septations and nothing else complicating it, probably well under 1%.
A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Gabor
32 years experience in Diagnostic Radiology
According to: the CDC, 12% of adults in US are diagnosed with sinusitis. According to cancer.gov, lifetime risk of CNS neoplasm is 0.6%. They are independent of o ... Read More
A 74-year-old male asked:
Dr. Andrew Doe
19 years experience in Interventional Radiology
Organ appear/functio: They are looking at the organs shape, size, appearance, and their ability to take up and "release" contrast.
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A 51-year-old member asked:
Dr. Yash Khanna
56 years experience in Family Medicine
Not very significant: With one cat scan of head the risk in men is 1 in 11080 and in women is 1 in 8100, there is also lot of variations in radiation exposure from one plac ... Read More
A 33-year-old male asked:
Dr. Herman Hammerstead
49 years experience in Trauma Surgery
None: If you are not having symptoms leave them alone, More people die of other causes and never know they had gallstones
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A 31-year-old female asked:
Dr. Katharine Cox
44 years experience in Pediatric Emergency Medicine
Spleen/free fluid: it is hard to know what the lesion in your spleen is without a better description. Some free fluid in the pelvis is normal, a larger amount may indica ... Read More
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1 thank
A 33-year-old male asked:
Dr. Felix Brizuela
31 years experience in Neurology
Depends.: we do not make a diagnosis of multisclerosisbased on the m_r_i, we basically primarily on your physical examination. We would have to know what your s ... Read More
A member asked:
Dr. Cole Livingston
8 years experience in Emergency Medicine
Extremely low.: The amount of radiation a patient is exposed to with a single computerized tomography (ct) scan is way below the amount required to inflict the necess ... Read More
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A 36-year-old female asked:
Dr. Charles Gordon
Specializes in Adolescent Medicine
Cysts: More likely infectious etiology but must ask your doc the cause, not us.
A 36-year-old male asked:
Dr. Arthur Heller
42 years experience in Gastroenterology
Lots: For. example, abnormalies in size or texture due to fat, or scar tissue, e.g. cirrhosis; masses due to fluid filled cysts, solid tumors (cancerous or ... Read More
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A 55-year-old member asked:
Dr. Geoffrey Rutledge
40 years experience in Internal Medicine
This : This depends widely on what part of the body is being imaged, what type of cancer is present (or hopefully not present), how large the cancer is, and ... Read More

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