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Vestibular neuritis

A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. Steven Beer
32 years experience Neurosurgery
Vertigo: Vestibular neuritis, can be a paroxysmal, single attack of vertigo, a series of attacks, or a persistent condition which diminishes over three to six ... Read More
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A 49-year-old male asked:
Dr. Steven Giannotta
48 years experience Neurosurgery
Symptomatically: In the early stages just anti nausea and anti dizzy medications. The acute effects usually go away after a few days.
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A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Kenneth Reichert
34 years experience Neurosurgery
Vestibular Neuroniti: In large part, the process involves examination that can explain a lesion in one or the other balance nerves. It is not possible on clinical examinati ... Read More
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A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. Chaim Colen
18 years experience Neurosurgery
ENT: Would see an ENT but, audiogram and an electronystagmograpy (test to record involuntary movements of the eye) would help..
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A 43-year-old male asked:
Dr. Djamchid Lotfi
57 years experience Neurology
Headache!: Vestibular migraine is rare but headache is a prominent feature
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A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. Richard Bensinger
51 years experience Ophthalmology
Vision deficit: Optic neuritis is caused by inflammation or disturbance of the main nerve of vision leading from the eye to the brain. Sometimes it is painful as wel ... Read More
A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. David Krulak
22 years experience Family Medicine
Vestibular neuritis: Acutely, vestibular neuritis is usually treated symptomatically, meaning that medications are given for nausea and to reduce dizziness. When a herpes ... Read More
A 52-year-old member asked:
Dr. James Goodrich
38 years experience Neurosurgery
Neuritis: Extremely unlikely to be contagious.
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A 50-year-old male asked:
Dr. Bernstein Joel
59 years experience ENT and Head and Neck Surgery
Yes: I can only relate to vestibular neuritis and yes it is virtually always a viral infection of the vestibular nerve or the ganglion cells of the vestibu ... Read More
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A 40-year-old female asked:
Dr. Jeffrey Kalt
33 years experience Ophthalmology
Optic neuritis: Optic neuritis can be an isolated finding, but is commonly associated with ms. Ms is believed to have an autoimmune etiology. Isolated optic neuritis ... Read More
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A 36-year-old male asked:
Dr. Marc Shomer
16 years experience Ophthalmology
No: There is no scientific evidence that this can happen from uv radiation. Focus uv radiation can cause retinal disease.
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A 41-year-old female asked:
Dr. Donald McCarren
35 years experience Neurology
Vestibular Neuritis?: Vestibular neuritis refers to an inner ear disorder without an identifiable cause. It can occur as a single event or recurrent attacks frequently ass ... Read More
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A 30-year-old member asked:
Dr. Virginia Simnad
27 years experience Neurology
See below: Optic neuritis is due to inflammation and damage of the insulation material around the nerve behind the eye ball (optic nerve). This results in varia ... Read More
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A 55-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bennett Machanic
51 years experience Neurology
Inflammation: The optic nerve becomes inflamed and results in decreased vision, pain on motion of the eye and faded color vision. A variety of causes may be consid ... Read More
A 35-year-old female asked:
Dr. Larry Marcus
40 years experience ENT and Head and Neck Surgery
No: Vestibular neuritis is an inflammation of the nerve of balance in your inner ear. Sometimes the inflammation also involves the adjacent nerve of hear ... Read More
A 50-year-old male asked:
Dr. Philip Creps
29 years experience Psychiatry
Not likely withdrawa: If your taper occurred from 1 mg to 0.5 mg, try adding 0.25 mg, but since you only took it once a day, withdrawal is unlikely.
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A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. James Goodrich
38 years experience Neurosurgery
Gluten: Vestibular neuritis is an inflammation of a nerve in the ear region - gluten can cause bowel issues but not typically a vestibular neuritis.
A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Ham
26 years experience Ophthalmology
Optic neuritis: Neuropathy is damage to the nerve, i.e. Vascular oclusion or trauma. Neuritis is inflamation to the optic nerve.
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A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. James Goodrich
38 years experience Neurosurgery
Vestibular neuritis: I have not heard of this one and very unlikely not related but perhaps one of the experts might have seen it, i think it highly unlikely to be related ... Read More
A 55-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bennett Machanic
51 years experience Neurology
Triggers: Do you mean paroxysmal vertigo or basilar migraine. Both can occur together or separately and vertigo is associated with migraine. This can be due t ... Read More
A member asked:
Dr. Bennett Machanic
51 years experience Neurology
Hearing tests: Almost all acoustic neuromas are associated with hearing loss, but other neurological signs may be found on exam, including problems with gait, facial ... Read More
A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. Larry Armstrong
26 years experience Neurosurgery
Inflammation: Neuritis is a word used by physicians to explain pain and inflammation of a nerve. Cranial neuritis usually applies to a nerve exiting the skull whic ... Read More
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A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Catherine Willner
34 years experience Neurology
No: Though optic neuritis might be the first presentation in someone who will develop ms, there are many times when it is simply optic neuritis. A thorou ... Read More
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A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Todd Purkiss
16 years experience Ophthalmology
The origin of it: Vestibular nystagmus is caused by a disturbance in the vestibular system of the inner ear. Cerebellar nystagmus is caused by a disturbance in the cer ... Read More
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A 28-year-old female asked:
Dr. Richard Bensinger
51 years experience Ophthalmology
No recourse: A crushed optic nerve (how did this happen to you?) causes permanent changes which will alter the vision sometimes severely. There is currently no tr ... Read More
A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Samuel Hunter
32 years experience Neurology
Vestibular neuritis: Usually low dose corticosteroids prednisone/methylprednisolone are used to speed recovery. To treat the vertigo, Meclizine or a benzodiazepine, like l ... Read More
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A 23-year-old female asked:
Dr. Djamchid Lotfi
57 years experience Neurology
Yes: Vestibular neuronitis (?viral) usually is short lived
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90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

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Personalized answers
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