Top answers from doctors based on your search:
Disclaimer

transient expressive aphasia

A member asked:
Dr. Bruce Jacobs
Specializes in Family Medicine
No, I don't think: so. See a Neurologist and get evaluation urgently.

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

Ask doctors free
Personalized answers
Free
Talk to a doctor
Unlimited visits
$10/month
A 39-year-old member asked:
Dr. Boris Aronzon
23 years experience in Anesthesiology
Looking back: Fortunately symptoms are resolved, because you said it was temporary speech loss. First thing to do is rule out stroke or transient ischemic attack. I ... Read More
A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Forshing Lui
42 years experience in Neurology
Aphasia yherapy: Speech therapy exercises may improve expressive aphasia. Try to talk more will help.
A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Julian Bragg
16 years experience in Neurology
Loss of language: Aphasia is an inability to properly use language, which can be caused by stroke, tumor, dementia, or many other diseases. There are many subtypes of ... Read More
3
3 thanks
A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alan Jacobs
31 years experience in Neurology
Typical no need: Tga, by virtue of being transient, resolves spontaneously without treatment. It is usually thought to be a migraine aura-based mechanism. Do no harm ... Read More
5
5 thanks
A 54-year-old member asked:
Dr. Gamal Boutros
38 years experience in Neurology
TGA: It is involvement of the temporal lobe in a migraine process ---or other process during which you cannot remember recent events.
4
4 thanks
A 11-year-old female asked:
Dr. Marc Zimmermann
21 years experience in Psychiatry
Many possibilities: There are a number of different conditions that might cause these symptoms. If your child's school has an assessment team ask them to help. If not c ... Read More
1
1 thank
A 71-year-old male asked:
Dr. Edgar Mendizabal
54 years experience in Internal Medicine
Parkinson's disease: Is someties difficult to treat. you might add bromocriptine
A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Peter Glusker
46 years experience in Neurology
Aphasias: Aphasia is a problem with language (with speech sounds being normal). Wernicke and broca's areas are regions of the brain where damage results in aph ... Read More
4
4 thanks
A 35-year-old female asked:
Dr. Dan Fisher
26 years experience in Internal Medicine
TGA/TEA: TEA recurs,is usually brief (
1
1 thank
A 58-year-old male asked:
Dr. Bennett Machanic
51 years experience in Neurology
Search for cause: The term "cerebral atrophy" is generic and does not explain why your dad is impaired. You truly need to have a full neurological evaluation, as the sy ... Read More
1
1 thank
A 39-year-old member asked:
Dr. Humberto Quintana
43 years experience in Psychiatry
LD= verbal/nonverbal: Most learning disabilities fall into one of two categories: verbal and nonverbal. People with verbal learning disabilities have difficulty with wor ... Read More
A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Colin Kerr
43 years experience in Family Medicine
TGA: Transient global amnesia (tga) has no known specific cause and no specific treatment. That's the bad news. The good news is that it almost always goes ... Read More
1
1 thank
A 34-year-old female asked:
Dr. Leonard Goodstein
Specializes in Clinical Psychology
Can't answer: There are several possibilities, but your question does not provide enough information to even guess at an answer. If you're seriously concerned seek ... Read More
A female asked:
Dr. Osman Mir
Dr. Osman Mir answered
20 years experience in Neurology
Yes it can affect. : Any therapy including speech and physical should be done on the orders of your treating physician. Best way is if you think your speech is affected a ... Read More
A 22-year-old male asked:
Dr. Eric Weisman
35 years experience in Neurology
Not usually: Many things can cause slurred speech. With certain neurological conditions that cause slurred speech focusing on the problem can make it worse. (We al ... Read More
2
2 thanks
A 39-year-old member asked:
Dr. James Ferguson
45 years experience in Pediatrics
In some cases: The types of events that can lead to motor disturbances in CP may also effect parts of the brain involved in reasoning, speach, math, etc. Consder rai ... Read More
A 30-year-old member asked:
Dr. David Miller
9 years experience in Family Medicine
Not common: Coprolalia is one of the more "flashy" symptoms of tourette syndrome (ts). When talk shows do episodes on ts, they always fill the stage with folks sh ... Read More
A 31-year-old female asked:
Dr. Adam Hebb
Dr. Adam Hebb answered
20 years experience in Neurosurgery
Lack of oxygen: In a stroke, brain areas that are essential to function such as language and movement are deprived of oxygen and nutrients. These areas stop functioni ... Read More
1
1 comment
1
1 thank
A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Robert Douglas
50 years experience in Orthodontics
Possibly Serious : See a physician right away to check this out.
A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Marlis Gonzalez fernandez
12 years experience in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Difficulty naming: Anomic aphasia is a language difficulty where the main deficit is naming. It occurs in people with brain problems most commonly stroke.
1
1 thank
A 11-year-old female asked:
Dr. Cindy Juster
35 years experience in Pediatrics
Please clarify.: Is she in speech therapy? If not, she needs to be. I'm unclear exactly what your question is; can you be more specific?
1
1 thank
A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Keith Baldwin
14 years experience in Pediatric Orthopedic Surgery
Spasticity: CP and myoclonus involve over active stretch reflexes. They are caused by release of these reflexes from higher cortical brain control.
1
1 thank

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

Ask doctors free
Personalized answers
Free
Talk to a doctor
Unlimited visits
$10/month