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A 49-year-old member asked:

What is wernicke's aphasia?

1 doctor answer3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Alan Ali
Dr. Alan Alianswered
Psychiatry 32 years experience
Wernike Aphasia: Speech is fluent but often degenerates into random hard to follow "streams of consciousness, which may be peppered with non-words or made up words. The speech also fails to provide good answers to questions posed to them, suggesting that they do not understand what is said to them. Hence there is difficulty in comprehension rather than articulation, hence the term Receptive Aphasia.

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A 40-year-old member asked:

What are brocas aphasia, and wernicke's aphasia?

2 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Peter Glusker
Neurology 47 years experience
Aphasias: Aphasia is a problem with language (with speech sounds being normal). Wernicke and broca's areas are regions of the brain where damage results in aphasia. Wernicke's aphasia, described as 'word salad', many words not making sense, while broca's aphasia is described as 'telegraphic', few words only. Aphasia can be 'expressive' for language output, or receptive. Google the names for brain maps.
A 34-year-old member asked:

What are the symptoms of Wernicke's aphasia?

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. Alan Ali
Dr. Alan Alianswered
Psychiatry 32 years experience
Wernike Aphasia: Speech is fluent but often degenerates into random hard to follow "streams of consciousness, which may be peppered with non-words or made up words. The speech also fails to provide good answers to questions posed to them, suggesting that they do not understand what is said to them. Hence there is difficulty in comprehension rather than articulation, hence the term Receptive Aphasia.
A 33-year-old member asked:

What is aphasia?

4 doctor answers8 doctors weighed in
Dr. Julian Bragg
Neurology 17 years experience
Loss of language: Aphasia is an inability to properly use language, which can be caused by stroke, tumor, dementia, or many other diseases. There are many subtypes of aphasia, depending on what type of language processes are affected.

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Last updated Apr 24, 2015
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