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Shin splints

A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Nolan Segal
A Verified Doctoranswered
A US doctor answeredLearn more
Inflammation: It is inflammation where the small muscle fibers attach to the bone along the tibia.
Dr. Thomas Deberardino
Orthopedic Surgery 33 years experience
Overuse tibia injury: Shin splints is an overuse stress injury to the tibial leg bone. Often times, a sudden rapid increase in either mileage or running intensity can trigg... Read More
Dr. Mark Galland
Orthopedic Surgery 33 years experience
Several Options...: "shin splint" typically refers to pain on the front of the lower leg, but can present in the back. Pain in this area may come from medial tibial stres... Read More

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A 31-year-old member asked:
Dr. Travis Swink
Family Medicine 24 years experience
Shin splints: They commonly occur due to poor stretching before rigorous running causing tearing and swelling of the sheath around the muscle.
Dr. Mark Galland
Orthopedic Surgery 33 years experience
Several Options...: "shin splint" typically refers to pain on the front of the lower leg, . Pain in this area may come from medial tibial stress syndrome (mtss), stress f... Read More
Dr. Darrell Latva
Podiatry 43 years experience
RISK FACTORS: Let me give you some risk factors: Smoking, more than 10 alcoholic drinks/week, female sex, sudden increase in activity, poor shoegear, flat feet.
A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. Kenneth Cheng
Family Medicine 32 years experience
Stretch instead: Taping is not nearly as effective as daily stretching of the anterior tibialis muscles.
Dr. Jeffrey Kass
Podiatry 29 years experience
Instead of taping: They do sell shin splint sleeves or braces. Orthotics or arch supports are very helpful as is stretching before and after running.
A 61-year-old member asked:
Dr. Marcus Romanello
Emergency Medicine 19 years experience
Rice: Rest ice compression massage possibly new training shoes decrease regimen.
A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. Rhett Griggs
Hand Surgery 20 years experience
Variable: Rest, ice, massage, graston, anti inflammatories, evaluation by ortho to check for stress fractures.
A 32-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bryan Reuss
Orthopedic Surgery 22 years experience
Rest: The simple answer is rest. Rest can take awhile though, so to speed it up i suggest: 1) anti-inflammatories 2) pt/stretching 3) good shoe wear/arch-s... Read More
A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. Pietro Seni
Orthopedic Surgery 48 years experience
Leg pain: You have the classical characteristic of what is called exertional comparmental syndrome, and usually due to the increasecomparmental pressure of the... Read More
A 32-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ronald Oberman
Podiatry 32 years experience
A few ways: Proper supportive shoe wear will help. Ice to the area after activity as well as stretching before and after activity will also help.
A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. Robert Lowe
Pediatric Rheumatology 18 years experience
Maybe,if not resting: Shin splints is an overuse injury that occurs when a person(often an athlete)increases their level of physical activity or training too quickly over a... Read More
A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ronald Oberman
Podiatry 32 years experience
Ice and rest: to start. My supportive shoes, orthotics and strtching program to follow. If persists, follow up with physician.
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