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Seroquel and trazadone bipolar

A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Laura Davies
24 years experience Psychiatry
It can.: Bipolar disorder involves both mania and depression. Seroquel (quetiapine) has been shown to be helpful in treating bipolar disorder. Not all medicat ... Read More
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Dr. Alan Ali
Dr. Alan Ali answered
32 years experience Psychiatry
Seroquel (quetiapine): Seroquel (quetiapine) has been shown effective add-on treatment for depression in bipolar do.

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A 30-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bassam Amawi
49 years experience Psychiatry
Orthostatic Hypotens: Trazadone can cause orthostatic hypotension and sedation. And at higher does antidepressant so if u give it for some one with bipolar diagnoses , may ... Read More
Dr. Seth Kunen
45 years experience Clinical Psychology
Depends . . .: Serious side effects (se’s) of trazodone are priapism, allergic reactions, problems breathing, thinking changes & stiff muscles. Sedation results fro ... Read More
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Dr. Alan Ali
Dr. Alan Ali answered
32 years experience Psychiatry
Trazodone: Common ones, being dose-dependent, are result of drying effects, such as dry mouth, blurred vision, constipation, dry skin, etc.
A 31-year-old female asked:
Dr. Lynne Weixel
36 years experience Clinical Psychology
Non-drug focus: From the series of questions you ask, I have a sense that your focus is very much on drugs and what they can or cannot do for you. I hope that you wil ... Read More
Dr. Heidi Fowler
25 years experience Psychiatry
Latuda (lurasidone) is not on our: Formulary -so i don't prescribe it. But in talking with other doctors they have used it 'off-label' for bipolar disorder w psychosis with good results ... Read More
Dr. Lincoln Bickford
15 years experience Psychiatry
Both can work: Both can be effective for bipolar depression. Latuda (lurasidone) is newer and most psychiatrists have less experience with it, and adverse effects a ... Read More
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1 thank
A 21-year-old male asked:
Dr. Pamela Pappas
42 years experience Psychiatry
Evaluation: You haven't said what type of evaluations you've had for your chronic insomnia. Medicating it has so far not been effective for you. Insomnia can be p ... Read More
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A 19-year-old male asked:
Dr. Paul Pyles
33 years experience Addiction Medicine
Talk to your doctor: This is a low dose of Seroquel (quetiapine). Some people experience prolonged drowsiness even at a low dose. Talk to your doctor. Sometimes the sedati ... Read More
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1 thank
A 49-year-old male asked:
Dr. Alan Ali
Dr. Alan Ali answered
32 years experience Psychiatry
Pregnant bipolar: Need to review risks/ benefits with your prescriber and your obstetrician. There are potential risks.
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1 thank
A 28-year-old female asked:
Dr. Patricia Foster
44 years experience Psychiatry
Yes: you can split these pills in half as long as you take the prescribed dose. Suggest you use a pill cutter. If you mean you are too scared to take the d ... Read More
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1 thank
A 17-year-old female asked:
Dr. Catherine Spratt turner
33 years experience Family Medicine
Seraquel: Seraquel has a sedation side effect. That is why you sleep great on it. It helps to control the manic portion of the bipolar. Talk to your doctor abou ... Read More
A 49-year-old female asked:
Dr. Donald Jacobson
A Verified Doctor answered
A US doctor answered Learn more
If UR stable: NO: There are many combinations of medications for all different phases and stages and types of bipolar disorder. The best combination is the one that wor ... Read More
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A 29-year-old male asked:
Dr. Carrie Cannon
A Verified Doctor answered
A US doctor answered Learn more
Seroquel (quetiapine) + Trazodone: There is a drug-drug interaction that can increase the risk of an irregular heart rhythm, although it is a rare side effect. You may be more at risk i ... Read More

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