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Radiation and bone cancer

A 44-year-old female asked:
Dr. Ed Friedlander
Pathology 44 years experience
Kills tumor: Radiation is more deadly to cancer cells than non-cancer cells because they are dividing more readily and probably even more so because their genome i... Read More
Dr. Andrew Turrisi
Radiation Oncology 47 years experience
Tumors can: Destroy the internal "marrow spaces" and even the hard surfaces. Bones have an innervated periosteum, sac around the bone, and it is the sretching th... Read More

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A 30-year-old member asked:
Dr. Stephen Noga
Medical Oncology 34 years experience
Can treat myeloma: If bone cancer refers to multiple myeloma, then yes radiation therapy is used to treat myeloma. Usually this is a localized use such as around a pend... Read More
Dr. Bahman Daneshfar
Radiation Oncology 33 years experience
Yes: Some people confuse bone cancer with when another type of cancer spreads to the bone (metastasis). Radiation can help the bone or the pain. As dr. N... Read More
Dr. Ilya Iofin
Orthopedic Surgery 18 years experience
Depends on cancer: Some bone cancers, like ewing's sarcoma and multiple myeloma, are very sensitive to radiation, making it a good treatment option. Others, like osteosa... Read More
A 51-year-old female asked:
Dr. Liawaty Ho
Hematology and Oncology 23 years experience
CEA: The declining of the cancer marker here tells you that you respond quite well to the radiation and chemotherapy that you received. Btw, what is the pr... Read More
A 35-year-old female asked:
Dr. Barry Rosen
General Surgery 34 years experience
No. : I'm sorry for your loss. Radiation therapy is used to treat bony metastasis which, as you know, can be quite painful. I assume that your father passed... Read More
A 51-year-old female asked:
Dr. Marwan Akasheh
Hematology and Oncology 39 years experience
Bone secondary: Dear the tumor markers are bad marker to assess disease progression or follow up since you get decreasing levels with more speard and increasing level... Read More
A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. Geoffrey Rutledge
Internal Medicine 41 years experience
The : The main risk of a ct scan is increased risk of developing cancer, but the risk is relatively small. A ct of the abdomen and pelvis increases the canc... Read More
A female asked:
Dr. Ed Friedlander
Pathology 44 years experience
What are you asking?: I am going to assume that the history is of a primary lung cancer metastatic to the brain and hip, with a good result from radiation and chemotherapy.... Read More
A 63-year-old male asked:
Dr. Tariq Niazi
Orthopedic Surgery 43 years experience
Small but definite -: Chance with your hx of prostate cancer. See your orthopod to get investigated. I am sure your oncologist must be following you if its only been 2 y... Read More
A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Luis Villaplana
Internal Medicine 35 years experience
Danger?: Primary bone tumors are very painful and tough to treat and cure. Some other cancers that start elsewhere will metastasize to bone. Breast and prostat... Read More
A 36-year-old member asked:
Dr. Liawaty Ho
Hematology and Oncology 23 years experience
Bone cancer: Primary bone cancer is less common than metastatic disease to the bone. Generally speaking, bone mass or lesion can be seen with the help of certain ... Read More

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