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Prednisone poison oak

A 24-year-old female asked:
Dr. Brian Lynch
Family Medicine 38 years experience
Epilepsy: Sometimes there are no good answers you're being treated correctly for the poison oak. One would need more history about the new relationship between ... Read More
Dr. John Chiu
Allergy and Immunology 57 years experience
No for short-term: Large doses of oral steroid often cause insomnia. I suspect that the dose is being tapered down daily at this point and the insomnia along with it. ... Read More
Dr. Laura Wuarin
Psychiatry 24 years experience
Yes: Prednisone is a strong steroid that can cause many side effects physically as well as in mental health such as mood swings, mania and insomnia. All of... Read More

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A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. Vicki Levine
Dermatology 41 years experience
Possibly none: If the Prednisone is only taken for a short. Of time there may be no side effects. Rarely even with a short course you can be more nervous and hungry ... Read More
A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. Gary Steven
Pediatric Allergy and Asthma 30 years experience
Depends on severity: Prednisone and the more potent steroid creams need to be prescribed by your doctor, anyway; have your doctor evaluate your rash and follow the advice ... Read More
Dr. Ted King
A Verified Doctoranswered
A US doctor answeredLearn more
Can use either: As dr. Steven said, it depends on how widespread it is. If it is only a few spots, a cream is fine. If you use a cream on the face, you have to be c... Read More
Dr. Eric L. Weiss
Travel Medicine 37 years experience
Probably pills: For more severe poison oak contact dermatitis even prescription strength steroid creams are not sufficiently effective. I recommend fairly aggressive ... Read More
A 25-year-old female asked:
Dr. Glynis Ablon
Dermatology 29 years experience
Perhaps this is not: poison oak. There are other causes of blistering rashes. See dermatologist and perhaps get biopsy or viral culture of blisters.
A 17-year-old female asked:
Dr. Marc Serota
Dermatology 14 years experience
Stop prednisone: Prednisone suppresses your immune system which can reactive HSV-1 (the cold sore virus) which normally remains inactive in your skin for life. I woul... Read More
A 36-year-old female asked:
Dr. John Chiu
Allergy and Immunology 57 years experience
Contamination: You are likely still having contact with the resin. You need to clean up every article which might have contacted poison oak with dish detergents (wea... Read More
A 18-year-old member asked:
Dr. Al Hegab
Dr. Al Hegabanswered
Allergy and Immunology 40 years experience
No: It won't, good that you asked, in general if in doubt in the future, use another form of contraception in addition till sure you are safe, good luck
A 29-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mika Hiramatsu
Pediatrics 32 years experience
Oral: Oral steroids are the fastest way. In the future, would recommend using tecnu soap.
A 30-year-old female asked:
Dr. James Ferguson
Pediatrics 46 years experience
Time/moisturizer: The prednisone decreased the intensity of your itching and amount of spread, but when it dries out it just needs time to heal. The dry skin will also ... Read More
A 31-year-old member asked:
Dr. Linda Green
Pediatric Allergy and Asthma 45 years experience
Contact dermatitis: Contact dermatitis from poison ivy, oak or sumac usually requires steroids, either topical steroid cream or oral steroids if more severe or widespread... Read More

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

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