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partial loss of vision in one eye temporary

A 50-year-old female asked:
Dr. Albert Pizzo
59 years experience in Family Medicine
Loss of vision: This may be a serious symptom and should be reported to your physician. You should get an appointment to be checked up.
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A 56-year-old member asked:
Dr. Stephen Wexler
38 years experience in Ophthalmology
Could be a TIA: A temporary loss of vision in one eye can be a sign of a TIA also known as a transient ischemic attack. It can be caused by small blood clots (emboli) ... Read More
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A 26-year-old male asked:
Dr. Pierre Guibor
54 years experience in Ophthalmology
Migraine?: You should be seen by an ophthalmologist / neurologist for evaluation for migraine.
A 32-year-old male asked:
Dr. Mitchell Vogel
29 years experience in Ophthalmology
Yes: Please see a doctor today! any loss of vision with other symptoms such as eyelid droop should be evaluated quickly. Please seek help from your docto ... Read More
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A 51-year-old male asked:
Dr. Jon Fishburn
29 years experience in Ophthalmology
ER visit: Loss of eyesight in one eye is an emergency. Have someone drive you to a nearby emergency health care facility asap! the causes for this vision loss ... Read More
A 52-year-old member asked:
Dr. David Chandler
32 years experience in Ophthalmology
Possible causes: A blockage of blood flow to the retina can lead to a black out of vision in one eye. This can be caused by plaque breaking off of an artery and lodgin ... Read More
A 51-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bennett Machanic
51 years experience in Neurology
Decreased blood flow: Your very precise description is consistent with interruption of blood flow in a branch of the retinal artery on one side. This needs attention, as a ... Read More
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A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ari Weitzner
32 years experience in Ophthalmology
Dryness: The bells palsy makes it hard to blink, so eye gets dried out and blurred.
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A female asked:
Dr. Sewa Legha
49 years experience in Medical Oncology
No!: Hemorrhoids have no connection with vision. You should get an eye specialist to check you as it sounds serious.
A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. Kyle Rhodes
17 years experience in Ophthalmology
Possibly: A hyphema usually is resorbed without permanent vision loss. However, if the blood stains the cornea, or the pressure inside the eye increases without ... Read More
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A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bernard Godley
31 years experience in Retinal Surgery
It depends: Vision loss can be due to a number of factors, including retinal detachment. In iowa city, iowa you are fortunate to be close to one of the nation's t ... Read More
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A 82-year-old male asked:
Dr. Tim Conrad
33 years experience in Ophthalmology
Not a TIA: If you still have vision loss beyond a few hours, you did not have a tia, you had a stroke. If it is getting worse, go directly to the emergency depa ... Read More
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A 50-year-old member asked:
Dr. Dan Fisher
26 years experience in Internal Medicine
TIA and stroke: Temporary blindness in one eye is known as tmvl - transient monocular visual loss and are definitely not normal. Symptoms may represent a benign cond ... Read More
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A 51-year-old member asked:
Dr. Derrick Lonsdale
72 years experience in Preventive Medicine
Doubt it: Bell's palsy affects the 7th cranial nerve (facial) while loss of vision suggests the optic nerve. See a neurologist asap.
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A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ilan Cohen
24 years experience in Ophthalmology
Yes: Viagra (sildenafil) use has been linked to a condition called ischemic optic neuropathy which can cause a sudden, painless decrease in vision in one e ... Read More
A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alan Jackson
29 years experience in Addiction Medicine
Many causes: It is best to have an ophthalmologist exam your eyes. Could be as simple as dryness or as serious as a retina problem.
A 50-year-old member asked:
Dr. Richard Bensinger
51 years experience in Ophthalmology
Occipital migraine: In this type of migraine, there is a loss of a portion up to all of the vision of 1/2 of the field of vision of both eyes (check by covering one eye ... Read More
A 35-year-old female asked:
Dr. Harold Peltan
27 years experience in Ophthalmology
Many causes: Get to your specialist eye md right away. Acute glaucoma is painful with steamy vision before the blindness, so unlikely in your case. Optic neuritis, ... Read More
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A 50-year-old member asked:
Dr. Richard Bensinger
51 years experience in Ophthalmology
Can be fixed: Droopy lids fall over the eye and start to obstruct the superior peripheral field. In more advanced cases they can actually obstruct the center and r ... Read More
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A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. Richard Bensinger
51 years experience in Ophthalmology
Short or long term?: The leading cause of correctable vision loss is cataract. Glaucoma causes a slowly evolving loss if unresponsive to treatment and causes much vision ... Read More
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A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Andrew Shatz
25 years experience in Ophthalmology
Not really: Atropine dilates the pupil, allowing more light into the eye and also increasing the width of the field of vision. Someone who has lost half of their ... Read More
A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Richard Scartozzi
18 years experience in Retinal Surgery
Many reasons: Optic disc drusen, papilledema, migraine, impending vascular occlusion, embolic disease, giant cell arteritis, etc. You need to see an eye doctor.
A 65-year-old female asked:
Dr. Jesse Krakauer
44 years experience in Endocrinology
Acute stroke: B"sd serious buisness. First thing to think about is a brainstem stroke with is a minutes count emergency. Other possiblity would be labyrinthitis, wh ... Read More
A 56-year-old member asked:
Dr. Gary Kilgo
Specializes in Neurology
Possible migraine: The loss of peripheral vision prior to a headache may be a migraine with aura, the aura may be the vision changes. This should be evaluated by a neuro ... Read More
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3 thanks

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

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Personalized answers
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