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mono low body temperature

A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jennifer Letourneau
20 years experience in Critical Care
Many: Low body temperature may be due to exposure to cold conditions, infections that lead to sepsis, use of alcohol or other drugs in the setting of cold c ... Read More
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A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jennifer Letourneau
20 years experience in Critical Care
It depends: Acute drops in body temperature can be a sign of an acute illness or injury and you should be seen by a health care provider right away. If this is a ... Read More
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A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Dennis Clifford
42 years experience in Pulmonary Critical Care
Hypothermia: Low body temperature can be environmental due to exposure, particularly wet cold conditions. Hypothyroidism is the most common metabolic condition ass ... Read More
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A member asked:
Dr. Gurmukh Singh
48 years experience in Pathology
How low?: A temperature slightly, up to 1 degree F, lower than the "normal" is okay if you have no symptoms. You may consult this site for more information on t ... Read More
A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Walter Kobasa
36 years experience in Obstetrics and Gynecology
Probably Not: Usually when you ovulate your basal body temp rises. After ovulation Progesterone is increased which would cause a rise in temp.
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A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. Oscar Novick
57 years experience in Pediatrics
Hfmd: Hfmd is usually present with a fever although it also present with low ir normal fever.
A 30-year-old female asked:
Dr. Nestor Del rosario
33 years experience in Addiction Medicine
97: The normal temperature is 98.6 degrees. When a composite of people are examined it is found that temperature can rise or decrease about 1.5 degrees de ... Read More
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A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ruth Spector
34 years experience in Critical Care
Variety: Hypothermia or low body temperature can be caused by endocrine disorders, most commonly hypothyroid , infection or exposure to prolonged elements. Th ... Read More
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A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jay Nemiro
44 years experience in Fertility Medicine
Ok: Although I am not a big fan of basal body temperature charts, you are using them, than typically, the temp drops prior to ovulation and than peaks app ... Read More
A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Steven Rosner
Specializes in Rheumatology
No (not directly): If a person become seriously infected (septic) while on an immunospressant they can have a low body temperature. Drugs that directly cause low body te ... Read More
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A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. Sanjay Agarwal
25 years experience in Pulmonology
No: It is well within the normal parameters from 97-99.
A 54-year-old male asked:
Dr. Dan Fisher
26 years experience in Internal Medicine
See below: Hypothermia, broken thermometers, poor measuring technique and hypothyroidism. Normal body temp really is about 98.2 although 98.6 is the "standard." ... Read More
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A 32-year-old male asked:
Dr. Bassam Amawi
48 years experience in Psychiatry
It seems U R having : Upper respiratory infection , see your PCP for evaluation and treatment.
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A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. William Lizarraga
15 years experience in Internal Medicine
Maybe-Do you feel ok: If you feel ok, then this might just be normal for you. It depends on how low these numbers are, of course. Sometimes low bp, hr, and t can indicat ... Read More
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A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. Timothy Raichle
21 years experience in Obstetrics and Gynecology
Basal body temp: After ovulation, your core body temperature actually increases about a degree. This stays elevated and then comes back down during your period. This ... Read More
A 31-year-old female asked:
Dr. Saptarshi Bandyopadhyay
20 years experience in Hospital-based practice
Sweating & inflammat: Both high body temp (fever) as well as low (hypothermia) are immune responses to an infection. IL-1, a key protein, causes sweating & a rise in bo ... Read More
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A 36-year-old female asked:
Dr. Vahe Yetimyan
50 years experience in General Practice
You need to have: more serious symptoms for lymphoma . Sounds like uri. See your doctor. I hope this helps. If you still have any concern or additional questions about ... Read More
A 40-year-old male asked:
Dr. Lonna Larsh
29 years experience in Family Medicine
Hormone problems: An underactive thyroid is the most common and easily treatable cause. Other hormones can affect temperature as well. Women generally have a higher b ... Read More
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A 26-year-old female asked:
Dr. Abdus Khan
29 years experience in Urgent Care
Need more info: Your numbers don't help ascertain what is going on. This value of eos can not be placed ion high category. Eos usually become high otherwise in allerg ... Read More
A 32-year-old male asked:
Dr. Manjeet Singh
9 years experience in Cardiac Electrophysiology
See your PCP: your husband needs to be seen and evaluated by his physician and probably needs extensive workup to determine the cause of his illness.
A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ronald Krauser
51 years experience in Rheumatology
No: No it does not.
A 27-year-old female asked:
Dr. Sadaf Mustafa
6 years experience in Internal Medicine
High WBC: Hello and welcome to HealthTap, there are various causes of increased WBC; infection, inflammation, reactive proliferation and blood cancers are among ... Read More
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A 27-year-old member asked:
Dr. David Sneid
40 years experience in Endocrinology
It doesn't "cause": chills, it just means you have less insulation against the ambient temperature.
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A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Gerard Honore
28 years experience in Fertility Medicine
A temperature: Is a temperature, regardless of what you call it. How high is it? If it's over 100.4 it's probably abnormal; otherwise its normal.

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