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kidney stones and phleboliths

A 43-year-old female asked:
Dr. Rex Mahnensmith
A Verified Doctor answered
A US doctor answered Learn more
Stones vs phlebolith: Kidney stones are not phleboliths and phleboliths are not kidney stones; phleboliths are calcification of pelvic blood vessels. Stones in ureter or ki ... Read More
Dr. Michael Gabor
32 years experience Diagnostic Radiology
Phleboliths: are a common incidental finding. They are calcifications of small pelvic veins. They generally cause no symptoms. Their main significance is that t ... Read More
Dr. Gerald Mandell
51 years experience Nuclear Medicine
Mostly not important: Phlebolith is small usually rounded, calcification within vein. These are very common in the veins of the lower part of the pelvis, and they are gene ... Read More

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A 45-year-old female asked:
Dr. Michael Gabor
32 years experience Diagnostic Radiology
Not sure.: Sometimes a phlebolith can't be differentiated from a distal ureter stone on xray, and a CT is done to make the distinction. Perhaps the calcified ve ... Read More
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1 thank
A female asked:
Dr. Joshua Emdur
Specializes in Family Medicine
Stones: The most common type of kidney stone is composed of calcium oxalate. Stones form in the urinary system for a number of different reasons. Once the s ... Read More
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4 thanks
Dr. Dean Giannone
24 years experience Internal Medicine
Metabolic issue.: Kidney stones are initiated by metabolic derangements in the handling of urinary oxalate, uric acid or calcium, for example. These derangements can be ... Read More
A 59-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ed Friedlander
43 years experience Pathology
Most just happen: Known causes are not drinking plenty of water, too much milk / antacids (rare), kidney infections (proteus bacteria), vitamin d abuse, some genetic te ... Read More
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9 thanks
A 34-year-old male asked:
Dr. Francisco R. Rodriguez
8 years experience Urology
Kidney stones: Most kidney stones are produced by a combination of factors: excessive excretion of calcium and possibly uric acid in the urine, combined with dehydra ... Read More
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8 thanks
A 73-year-old female asked:
Dr. Joe Littlejohn
25 years experience Urology
Nephrolithiasis: There are many different types of stones including calcium oxalate (mono & dihydrate), calcium phosphate, struvite, cystine, indinvir, matrix and uric ... Read More
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3 thanks
A 36-year-old female asked:
Dr. Gurmukh Singh
48 years experience Pathology
Multiple issues: Heredity, male sex, low water intake, increased solutes in urine, obesity etc. Check out the site given below for more info. http://www.bing.com/hea ... Read More
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4 thanks
A 23-year-old female asked:
Dr. Ivan Colon
26 years experience Urology
X-rays: With either a sonogram, x-ray (kub) or ct of the abdomen without any contrast. The best method is a ct as it can give exact location and weather it ... Read More
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1 thank
A 42-year-old male asked:
Dr. Shari Jackson
20 years experience Radiology
Variable: Some kidney stones are asymptomatic, but even then may cause blood in the urine. If they get large enough and/or cause obstruction in the kidney or u ... Read More
A 33-year-old member asked:
Dr. James Lin
A Verified Doctor answered
A US doctor answered Learn more
Here are some...: Most of stone patients have their inborn derangement in handling acidity of the body including renal tubular acidosis and shortage of stone inhibito ... Read More

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