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how do i calculate target heart rate with coronary artery disease

A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mathew Chengot
42 years experience Cardiology
See below: 220 (-)your age - is the 100% usual cardio work out range is 70 - 80% of this number.

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A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. John Szawaluk
30 years experience Cardiology
See Below: A common formula for calculating target heart rate is 220 minus age x 0.85.
A 39-year-old member asked:
Dr. Rick Koch
Dr. Rick Koch answered
21 years experience Cardiology
On stress test : Target heart rate is defined as 86% of maximal predicted heart rate. Mphr = 220-age in years.
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A 39-year-old member asked:
Dr. Rajendra Tripathi
44 years experience Orthopedic Surgery
90- 153: Remember it is just a target heart rate to get to during exercise, and not a number to get fixated to as you can see this is quite a wide range maxim ... Read More
A 34-year-old member asked:
Dr. Elden Rand
20 years experience Cardiology
Target Heart Rate: Your maximum heart rate is 220 - age. Your training heart rate range is classically spoken of as between 60-80% of your maximum.
A male asked:
Dr. Sheldon Brownstein
Specializes in Cardiac Electrophysiology
Stress test: Equivocal changes imply that Ekg on test show changes which were suggestive of positive but may have not met criteria completely. Using echocardiogram ... Read More
A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Richard Humes
40 years experience Pediatric Cardiology
Circular question: By itself, a high heart rate will result in higher oxygen demand and utilization, but delivery should also increase to compensate. So everything shoul ... Read More
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3 thanks
A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. Shoaib Shafique
33 years experience Vascular Surgery
Decrease: In coronary perfusion pressure due to shortened diastole. Oxygen demand is increased but perfusion may not keep up if there is narrowing of coronary a ... Read More
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A 33-year-old male asked:
Dr. Susan Arnoult
24 years experience Family Medicine
Cardiologist: You need to consult with a cardiologist for testing. In the meantime I would not engage in vigorous sporting activities. If you feel like you are al ... Read More
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A 30-year-old member asked:
Dr. Nathan Ritter
23 years experience Cardiology
Nothing: When people ask me about what their target hr should be when working out, i tell them that the workout intensity is more important than heart rate. So ... Read More

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