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heart rate 153 dangerous

A 59-year-old female asked:
Dr. Laura Anissian
20 years experience in Internal Medicine
153: If this is a HR without exercise then I would be concerned. I would discuss this with your provider and get an EKG

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A 55-year-old female asked:
Dr. Venkata Chilakapati
22 years experience in Cardiology
Slow heart beat: If you don't have any symptoms like dizziness, pre-syncope, syncope or fatigue or chest pain or shortness of breath, then you are ok. But you complain ... Read More
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A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Calvin Weisberger
50 years experience in Cardiology
Heart rate: Normally heart rate responds to exercise or physiologic demand levels. Usually we don't see it go over 180-200 even with high levels of exercise. This ... Read More
A 28-year-old member asked:
Dr. Louis Grenzer
54 years experience in Cardiology
Varies: There is no specific dangerous heart rate during exercise. How fast your heart beats with exercise depends on a number of factors, especially your con ... Read More
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A 37-year-old female asked:
Dr. Dan Fisher
26 years experience in Internal Medicine
Too complicated: In general the answer would be no, but your situation is quite complicated and you will need to discuss with your doc or cardiologist.
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A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Rodney Del Valle
35 years experience in Anesthesiology
It's : Fine at 8 weeks. Continue with OB care regularly.
A 26-year-old female asked:
Dr. Christopher Dowd
19 years experience in Internal Medicine
I think so: I think ur asking if a heart rate of 81 when you are not resting (so perhaps after you exercise?) is a safe rate; if that's correct then yes 81 is pro ... Read More
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A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Payam Mehranpour
22 years experience in Cardiology
Fetal heart rate: Use of such steroids during pregnancy has been associated with decreased variability of fetal heart rate. I am not aware of slowing down of heart rate ... Read More
A 54-year-old member asked:
Dr. Steven Saunders
42 years experience in Internal Medicine
SEE YOUR DOCTOR: Arrythmias are heart rhythm disturbances which can be dangerous but controlled with medication and or interventional procedures. Talk with your doctor ... Read More
A 41-year-old female asked:
Dr. Michael Jones
21 years experience in Family Medicine
No: Pvcs in and of themselves do not cause a rapid heart rate. However, a rapid heart rate may make pvcs or the sensation of palpitations more noticeable.
A female asked:
Dr. Douglas Mund
45 years experience in Rheumatology
May be very dangerou: There are many reasons for a very rapid heart rate. Some may be quite serious and even life threatening You should see your physician and be evaluated ... Read More
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A 21-year-old male asked:
Dr. Glenn Messina
34 years experience in Aesthetic Medicine
Depends: There are a variety of palpitations some dangerous some not. I may have just answered another question that could have been yours as well. The cardiol ... Read More
A 30-year-old female asked:
Dr. Giridhar Vedala
27 years experience in Cardiology
Usually not: They type of palpitations with low magnesium are usually more benign such as PACs and PVCs, but it does depend on the individual. Ideally having a mon ... Read More
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A 32-year-old male asked:
Dr. Scott Koppel
27 years experience in Podiatry
Possibly: Tachycardia may lead to a heart attack. If your resting heart rate is above 100 beats per minute, seek medical care/.
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A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Elena Vezza
Specializes in Internal Medicine
No: Other things cause increase in heart rate. obesity alone does not. food that contain caffeine, diet supplements, stress, anxiety all can cause increas ... Read More
A 39-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jeffrey Buchsbaum
30 years experience in Radiation Oncology
Probably not.: This is perhaps the most complete answer on electromagnetic energy (cell phones in this case) and cancer. In short, we cannot say yes for sure, but we ... Read More
A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. Deepti Saxena
24 years experience in Internal Medicine
Could be: Would be nice to get annual physical check up done to know the real cause.
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A 28-year-old male asked:
Dr. Payam Mehranpour
22 years experience in Cardiology
Maximum: Maximum predicted heart rate is calculated as 220-age. For a 22 year old the maximum heart rate is therefore 198 bpm. If your heart rate reaches 250-2 ... Read More
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A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Nikolaos Zacharias
25 years experience in Maternal-Fetal Medicine
Many causes.: Bradyarrhythmias (heart block, hypothyroidism, drugs) can lower the fetal heart rate persistently, however the most common reason is cord or placental ... Read More
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A 50-year-old member asked:
Dr. Robert Vogt Lowell
Specializes in Pediatric Cardiology
How old is your baby: A heart rate of 160 can be perfectly normal in a newborn baby and with activity or fever in babies up to several months of age, so it all depends on h ... Read More
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A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Walter Pierce
35 years experience in Cardiology
Not usually: Caffeine can cause palpitations. Removing caffeine should stop racing hearts. Caffeine withdrawal may give a headache.
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1 thank
A 29-year-old male asked:
Dr. Tonga Nfor
15 years experience in Cardiology
More workup: Heart rate increases from standing in normal people, but increases even more in people with pots. There are other symptoms associated in addition to t ... Read More
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4 thanks
A 23-year-old male asked:
Dr. Warren Foster
19 years experience in Cardiac Electrophysiology
Not exactly: Your heart rate tends to fall lower, than resting, when you are sleeping. You may also be prone to faster heart rates, during different stages of sle ... Read More
A 25-year-old female asked:
Dr. Rola Rimawi
19 years experience in Internal Medicine
Normal: A heart rate of 106 can be a normal response to fever, illness, dehydration, fear, exercise, etc.. If you have a personal or family history of heart d ... Read More
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1 thank

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