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hands cracking blistering

A 31-year-old member asked:
Dr. Dan Fisher
26 years experience in Internal Medicine
Eczema: Sounds like eczema. Needs to be treated with mid to high potency steroids. Could try twice daily Hydrocortisone ointment and strict avoidance of so ... Read More
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A 55-year-old male asked:
Dr. Tony Ho
Dr. Tony Ho answered
13 years experience in Infectious Disease
See dermatologist: A number of things can cause this; what it sounds like is a contact dermatitis vs. A dishidrotic eczema. A dermatologist will be able to evaluate and ... Read More
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A 55-year-old female asked:
Dr. Robert Kwok
32 years experience in Pediatrics
Doctor can examine: Things that cause blistering on hands or fingers include a type of eczema called dishydrotic eczema, allergic reactions (sometime to unknown substance ... Read More
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A female asked:
Dr. Juan Qiu
Dr. Juan Qiu answered
Specializes in Family Medicine
See doctor: you should see a doctor, may need a different cream. Would recommend not popping to avoid infection.
A 33-year-old male asked:
Dr. Jimmy Bowen
33 years experience in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Itchy cracking skin: Contact dermatitis, ezcema, over washing and drying, psoriasis, many causes. Any more information or symptoms?
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A 39-year-old member asked:
Dr. Erine Kupetsky
15 years experience in Family Medicine
Dyshidrotic eczema?: Dyshidroyic eczema is a form of eczema that presents with water-filled vesicles, peeling, dry cracks (sometimes fissures) on sides of fingers.
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A 54-year-old female asked:
Dr. Yash Khanna
56 years experience in Family Medicine
Use hand cream or lo: Use any moisturising cream or lotion and the new skin will come.
A 34-year-old female asked:
Dr. Ira Katz
Dr. Ira Katz answered
23 years experience in Endocrinology
Need Evaluation: This can be a lot of things, first thing that comes to mind is pemphigus, a skin condition that blisters and if rubbed the skin can slough off. You c ... Read More
A 32-year-old member asked:
Dr. Steven Saunders
42 years experience in Internal Medicine
Dry skin: Could be psoriasis or callus sing from repetitive use. Your doctor can tell.
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A 52-year-old female asked:
Dr. Arthur Balin
46 years experience in Dermatology
Dry peeling skin: There are a number of causes of dry peeling skin. You can use a cream like lachydrin (lactic acid) twice daily to improve the symptoms. I think 5% is ... Read More
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A 60-year-old female asked:
Dr. Jeffrey Kass
27 years experience in Podiatry
Could be : Fungal, or dyshydrotic eczema to name two of the more common conditions.
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A 21-year-old female asked:
Dr. Alvin Wells
41 years experience in Rheumatology
Knuckle wrinkles: Wrinkles on the knuckles are natural and allow the motion for example when making a fist. As a rheumatologist, it is the loss or lack or wrinkles that ... Read More
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A 56-year-old female asked:
Dr. Tracy Lovell
20 years experience in Rheumatology
Difficult to say: You may have raynauds with some type of inflammatory arhritis based on the limited information provided. See your doctor for further evlaution.
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A 27-year-old female asked:
Dr. John Chiu
Dr. John Chiu answered
56 years experience in Allergy and Immunology
Irritant dermatitis?: If you wash your arms and hands a lot, the skin gets dry. Once it gets irritated, anything you put on may hurt you. The itching and blister point more ... Read More
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A 55-year-old member asked:
Dr. Angelo Mitsos
39 years experience in Podiatry
Osteoarthritis: Generally speaking there is more pressure on the joints of the lower extremity than the joints on the hands. This "wear and tear" on the joints of th ... Read More
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A male asked:
Dr. Howard Fox
41 years experience in Podiatry
Well, : Well, you so seem to be describing athlete's foot, a topical fungal infection, although there are other skin disorders that could also cause itching a ... Read More
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A 52-year-old member asked:
Dr. Yash Khanna
56 years experience in Family Medicine
Red bumps on arms l: It seems like you have some kind of ongoing contact dermatitis and you need to be evaluated by you physician.If it was viral illness which can present ... Read More
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A 32-year-old male asked:
Dr. Robert Jackson
42 years experience in Dermatology
PPlease see: Please see your dermatologist for evaluation and to discuss treatment options.
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A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Glynis Ablon
28 years experience in Dermatology
Add moisturizer: oral vitamin E, and see dermatologist if not improving
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A member asked:
Dr. Jeffrey Bassman
44 years experience in Dentistry
Not necessarily: There are varied opinions on whether cracking of the joints can cause harm. With a TMJ/TMD issue, definitely. With the hands, fingers, neck...depend ... Read More
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A 51-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jeffrey Whitman
44 years experience in Ophthalmology
Sun damage: Does not have to be dry to peel. The sun actually blisters up the skin and you slough the outer layer, dry or not.
A 26-year-old female asked:
Dr. Rebecca Gliksman
37 years experience in Internal Medicine
Blisters on hand: May be dyshidrosis, a form of eczema or eczema . Antihistamines may help as can topical steroids may help in short term but long term can repredispos ... Read More
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A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. Raymond Schneider
45 years experience in Family Medicine
Eczema: Probably dyshidrotic eczema. The blisters tend to open and then the underlying tissue feels raw usually we use topical steroid cream but the otc ste ... Read More
A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Fawn Winkelman
10 years experience in Family Medicine
Jaundice: Jaundice is the yellowing of the skin and eyes and forms when there is too much bilirubin, which is a yellow pigment that is formed by the breakdown o ... Read More

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

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