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dislocation after hip replacement

A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. Geoffrey Rutledge
40 years experience Internal Medicine
Yes. : Yes. By nature of the fact that the muscles and capsule that surround and support the native hip are cut during the approach to the hip during surgery ... Read More
Dr. Bertrand Kaper
28 years experience Orthopedic Reconstructive Surgery
1-2%: Dislocation is the most common complication after a total hip replacement, but fortunately does not occurr frequently. The surgical approach used doe ... Read More
Dr. David Fisher
38 years experience Orthopedic Surgery
Low risk: Dislocation can occur after a tha but is generally very low and dependent on the original surgical approach, femoral ball size, and skill of the surge ... Read More
2
2 thanks

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A 58-year-old female asked:
Dr. Donald Hohman Jr
12 years experience Orthopedic Reconstructive Surgery
No problem: As long as the hip components are well positioned and the seat height is appropriately adjusted you should not have a problem.
A 63-year-old member asked:
Dr. David Hicks
42 years experience Family Medicine
Should already know: The best answer is since you already had the surgery , would you not have asked this question before hand and probably was explained in the consent f ... Read More
1
1 thank
Dr. Robert Cusick
8 years experience Orthopedic Reconstructive Surgery
Not common: With current techniques, regardless of the approach used for your surgery, the possiblity of dislocation or loosening of components is very low. The ... Read More
5
5 thanks
A 50-year-old female asked:
Dr. Pietro Seni
46 years experience Orthopedic Surgery
Many factors: Many factors play a role in a post op hip dislocation specially after revision, poor soft tissue envelope, week muscles position of the components.Nee ... Read More
4
4 thanks
A 86-year-old male asked:
Dr. Peter Ihle
53 years experience Orthopedic Surgery
They depend on the-: -approach used, either posterior or anterior. But 4 post, no internal rotation of the hip or crossing legs. These R basic. Ant. avoid external rotatio ... Read More
1
1 thank
A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Tariq Niazi
42 years experience Orthopedic Surgery
There are a number -: Of others, like infection, bleeding requiring transfusions, nerve injury, leg clots which may prove fatal if it moves to the lungs; wound healing pro ... Read More
A 38-year-old male asked:
Dr. Louis Gallia
44 years experience Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
6 months: At least 6 months. The person you want to ask that question is the orthopedic surgeon doing the hip replacement. He/she should make the call. Also, th ... Read More
1
1 comment
A 47-year-old female asked:
Dr. Jeffrey Kass
27 years experience Podiatry
Speak to your doc: Perhaps they will give you an alternative pain killer. I would also recommend you ice as much as possible. Keep yourself well hydrated.
A 66-year-old female asked:
Dr. Donald Colantino
60 years experience Internal Medicine
Uncommon: If your sciatic pain has been going on for 8 months, you may be dealing with a herniated lumbar disc and an MRI of your lumbosacral spine would be wor ... Read More
A 34-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jacek Jodelka
13 years experience Internal Medicine
Moderately risky: It's considered a surgery with moderately high risk (blood loss, anesthesia complications) if not done emergently, certain patients should be screened ... Read More
6
6 thanks

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