Top answers from doctors based on your search:
Disclaimer

Citalopram

A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. ChristieLynne Williamson
11 years experience in Pharmacology
Citalopram Usage: Citslopram is a medication used to treat depression. It is in a class of drugs called ssris, or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. These increas ... Read More
8
8 thanks

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

Ask doctors free
Personalized answers
Free
Talk to a doctor
Unlimited visits
$10/month
A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Evaristo Badiola
46 years experience in Psychiatry
Not necessarily.: Studies have shown that 40 mg of citalopram is as good as 60 mg. Always go for the lowest effective dose.
4
4 thanks
A member asked:
Dr. Alan Ali
Dr. Alan Ali answered
31 years experience in Psychiatry
Beau's lines: Those ridges on nail beds are caused by injury, infection, low calcium , skin disease, some chemotherapy drugs, or malnutrition. I am not aware of Ce ... Read More
1
1 thank
A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Edward Kuhnley
44 years experience in Child Psychiatry
Citalopram is a SSRI: Antidepressant, i.e. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor that improves serotonin tone in nerve transmission to treat depression & anxiety. Advers ... Read More
6
6 thanks
A 47-year-old female asked:
Dr. Heidi Fowler
24 years experience in Psychiatry
SSRI's: They are both ssri's. I have found both effective when treating patients. Either are good options for conditions like post traumatic stress disorder, ... Read More
10
10 thanks
A 54-year-old male asked:
Dr. Lynne Weixel
35 years experience in Clinical Psychology
Yes, some major: The major alerts are for the risk of serotonin syndrome. Several other concerns exist between these drugs and include increased risks for the common s ... Read More
A 25-year-old male asked:
Dr. Patricia Foster
43 years experience in Psychiatry
Can be: A common side effect of Zoloft (sertraline) is drowsiness. Bedtime dosing may allay the problem. Be sure to discuss any side effects with your prescri ... Read More
A 26-year-old female asked:
Dr. Pamela Pappas
41 years experience in Psychiatry
Need longer to know: Citalopram may need at least 4-6 (even 8) weeks for effectiveness to show. Please keep in contact with your physician, as s/he will want to know how ... Read More
1
1 thank
A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. Horacio Capote
Specializes in Psychiatry
It doesn't matter: Most people take it in the evening because it may make you a little tired. However, it is equally effective in combating depression regardless of the ... Read More
1
1 thank
A 56-year-old member asked:
Dr. Seth Kunen
44 years experience in Clinical Psychology
See below: Lexapro (escitalopram) is an ssri and is basically the "pure" form of citalopram. Most common se's effects are constipation, decreased sexual drive, ... Read More
17
17 thanks
A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. Kaushik Raval
36 years experience in Psychiatry
No: If your fatigue is related to depression or anxiety then both Celexa and zoloft (sertraline) might help.
A 54-year-old male asked:
Dr. Emma Rishton
12 years experience in Clinical Psychology
Ask again: You have a question about Paxil (paroxetine) and Zoloft. Ask more specifically and I'm sure someone will be happy to help. Also, don't hesitate to ask ... Read More
2
2 thanks
A 36-year-old male asked:
Dr. Mohammed Younus
30 years experience in Psychiatry
SSRI antidepressant: Citalopram is a ssri medication used to treat anxiety and depression disorders, it's also used to treat ptsd and ocd. It takes 4 to 6 weeks to be full ... Read More
3
3 thanks
A 41-year-old female asked:
Dr. Austina Cho
25 years experience in Psychiatry
Pain and depression : Sometimes headaches may be a somatic or physical manifestation of depression or anxiety. In that case, antidepressants such as Celexa (citalopram) may ... Read More
2
2 thanks
A 54-year-old female asked:
Dr. Mark Reynolds
32 years experience in Psychiatry
Yes: Lexapro (escitalopram) requires a prescription.
3
3 thanks
A 55-year-old member asked:
Dr. Marc Zimmermann
21 years experience in Psychiatry
Common effects: •drowsiness •vomiting •increased heart rate (tachycardia) or slow heart rate (bradycardia) •nausea •dizziness •agitation •shakiness (tremor). •com ... Read More
6
6 thanks
A 38-year-old female asked:
Dr. Felix Toro
39 years experience in Anti-Aging Medicine
OK: It is always best to ask your Doctor as he should know your full medical history and would not prescribe it if there were contra indications. This co ... Read More
1
1 thank
A 45-year-old female asked:
Dr. Jagwinder Sandhu
26 years experience in Psychiatry
Switching meds: Yes they can be taken together when cross tapering but you have to watch for possible rare phenomenon called serotonin syndrome.You need to discuss wi ... Read More
6
6 thanks
A 33-year-old female asked:
Dr. Donald Colantino
60 years experience in Internal Medicine
Celexa (citalopram): The usual starting dose is 20mg once daily. I feel that collaboration between the cardiologist and the psychiatrist is advisable in this case in view ... Read More
1
1 thank
A 34-year-old female asked:
Dr. Patrick Tapia
12 years experience in Psychiatry
Low probability: There are the possibility of low probability side effects. With respect to specific interactions, the most prominent thing to remember is that if you ... Read More
2
2 thanks
A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Cyma Khalily
34 years experience in Psychiatry
DEPENDS: For the right illness Prozac (fluoxetine) can be very effective. Indicated for depression, anxiety, panic, social anxiety, ocd, pmdd.
2
2 thanks
A 38-year-old female asked:
Dr. Chirag Patel
Specializes in Neurology
See your physician: There are many types of headaches (migraine, tension, cluster) and many reasons for each type. Alternatively, you could have sinus or other issues. It ... Read More
A 54-year-old male asked:
Dr. Maggie Carpenter
23 years experience in Family Medicine
Too many meds: Taking all of these medications together is not a good idea. You run the risk of serotonin syndrome, a potentially lethal condition and you are at inc ... Read More
A 56-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alan Ali
Dr. Alan Ali answered
31 years experience in Psychiatry
Celexa (citalopram): Not by itself, but in combination with mood stabilizers.
A 56-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mark Reynolds
32 years experience in Psychiatry
Celexa (citalopram): Generally very well tolerated, side effects may include constipation; decreased sexual desire or ability; diarrhea; dizziness; drowsiness; dry mouth; ... Read More
2
2 thanks
A 37-year-old male asked:
Dr. Jeffrey Juchau
32 years experience in Family Medicine
Citalopram: Like most antidepressants of the SSRI group it usually takes 4-67 weeks for it to be fully effective. Some of my patients notice effects as early as ... Read More
A 45-year-old female asked:
Dr. Dariush Saghafi
32 years experience in Neurology
If by doctor's order: If you're taking these medications on doctor's order then, I cannot tell you NOT to take either one of them or any of them. But if what you're asking ... Read More
A 29-year-old female asked:
Dr. Kevin Passer
34 years experience in Child Psychiatry
Nothing?: I have patients tell me all the time: "nothing works." can you see how you defeat yourself by thinking that? I am sure you are very frustrated. If you ... Read More
A 39-year-old female asked:
Dr. Robert Killian
27 years experience in General Practice
Too many medications: Nope. Only because you are on too many medications at once. This level of medications cannot possibly be safe in any circumstance. There is no scien ... Read More
3
3 comments
3
3 thanks
A 52-year-old member asked:
Dr. James Fox
Dr. James Fox answered
13 years experience in Psychiatry
Withdrawal?: Do you mean, when do withdrawal symptoms kick in? If you have been tapered off the medication in a thoughtful way, then you shouldn't experience with ... Read More
2
2 thanks
A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ruth Crystal
26 years experience in Obstetrics and Gynecology
No: Please see this patient handout link from otis: http://www.Otispregnancy.Org/files/citalopram.Pdf.
1
1 thank
A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Barbara Srur
41 years experience in Psychiatry
Possibly: Lexapro (escitalopram) affects serotonin, a neurotransmitter in the brain that modulates mood as well as anxiety. Lowering the dose of Lexapro (escit ... Read More
3
3 thanks
A 35-year-old male asked:
Dr. Pamela Pappas
41 years experience in Psychiatry
Gingko biloba: The elimination half-lives of the most active constituents in gingko (gingkolide a ; b, and bilobalide) are 2-7 hours. This means they would be effect ... Read More
1
1 thank
A 67-year-old member asked:
Dr. J. Kirk Clopton
31 years experience in Psychiatry
Typically few: These are medications that can be used in combination to treat depressive symptoms. The most common adverse interactions can be fatigue and weight gai ... Read More
3
3 thanks
A 33-year-old female asked:
Dr. Margret Rose Dellosso
18 years experience in Clinical Psychology
Possibly : You should never stop anything cold turkey without discussing it with a physician. I know you may have panicked when you found out you were pregnant b ... Read More
A 53-year-old female asked:
Dr. Alan Ali
Dr. Alan Ali answered
31 years experience in Psychiatry
Zoloft (sertraline): Zoloft (sertraline) is an ssri antidepressant, not a benzo.
1
1 thank
A 60-year-old female asked:
Dr. Bennett Werner
43 years experience in Cardiology
Use a low dose: Both escitalopram and wellbutrin (bupropion) inhibit liver metabolism (which is how Propranolol is metabolized) and both will result is a stronger Pro ... Read More
A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Glen Elliott
42 years experience in Child Psychiatry
Depends on amount: Taking more or less of a prescription medicatoin than the doctor has ordered is rarely if ever a good idea. Accidental missed or double doses do occu ... Read More
A 66-year-old female asked:
Dr. John Michel
45 years experience in Family Medicine
Yes but: This seems a bit much for anyone. Is there a way that you can speak to your doctor about streamlining your meds. The doc is treating you for bipolar ... Read More
1
1 thank
A 54-year-old member asked:
Dr. Neil Liebowitz
38 years experience in Psychiatry
Not seen: As noted in other response, i've seen with wellbutrin and meds affecting norepinephrine such as cymbalta (duloxetine). Anxiety makes it worse. Check ... Read More
4
4 thanks
A 54-year-old member asked:
Dr. John Moranville
35 years experience in Psychiatry
Maybe none: Most tolerate it well. Most common are nausea, sedation, insomnia, sweating, tremor, diarrhea, or increased anxiety which are usually transient if the ... Read More
11
11 thanks
A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mark Shukhman
30 years experience in Addiction Medicine
Quickly: The medication itself does not stay in the body for very long time. Probably, in a few days, it is gone. The effect from citalopram might last for a n ... Read More
5
5 thanks
A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. Pamela Pappas
41 years experience in Psychiatry
Citalopram: The elimination half-life of citalopram can be from 23-45 hours -- and it takes 5 times this for a medication to be processed from your body. By this ... Read More
A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. Steven Reidbord
35 years experience in Psychiatry
2+ weeks, roughly: Antidepressants take some time to start working, and they take a similar amount of time to stop working, too. This varies from about a week to a mont ... Read More
3
3 thanks
A 29-year-old male asked:
Dr. Alan Ali
Dr. Alan Ali answered
31 years experience in Psychiatry
Celexa (citalopram): Not likely. We normally prescribe Celexa (citalopram) as once or twice daily, up to 40 mg. Daily dose, for depression/anxiety.
A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Austina Cho
25 years experience in Psychiatry
May cause GI symptom: Garcinia is a fruit extract marketed as a weight loss supplement. High doses of garcinia may act as a laxative. Be careful of excess nausea, vomiting ... Read More
1
1 thank
A 38-year-old female asked:
Dr. Ernest Bordini
31 years experience in Clinical Psychology
Manic like reactions: Citalopram alone or in combo with a stimulant can cause exciteability and hypomanic if not manic or psychotic symptoms. Though not frequent, not enti ... Read More
1
1 thank
A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Barbara A Majeroni
Specializes in Family Medicine
Why?: I don't find any reports of interactions from taking these 2 drugs together.
1
1 thank
A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Goodhope
20 years experience in Family Medicine
About 5 days.: It generally takes five 1/2 lives for a drug to clear your system. If a drug is daily dose then 1/2 life is usually one day. You may feel slightly ... Read More
2
2 thanks
A 21-year-old female asked:
Dr. John Munshower
29 years experience in Family Medicine
1 extra dose: 1 extra dose should not cause you any serious issues. BUT, you need to be aware of and remember your daily dosing better. Try putting the meds the s ... Read More
1
1 thank

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

Ask doctors free
Personalized answers
Free
Talk to a doctor
Unlimited visits
$10/month