Top answers from doctors based on your search:
Disclaimer

blood type diet o negative food list

A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Dugan
Specializes in Hematology
Type O blood: Is the most common, but rh negative is less common than rh positive.

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

Ask doctors free
Personalized answers
Free
Talk to a doctor
Unlimited visits
$10/month
A 30-year-old male asked:
Dr. Gurmukh Singh
48 years experience Pathology
Caloric balance: You blood group type is irrelevant to weight loss. You need to reduce your caloric intake and increase physical activity. Losing weight is not easy, a ... Read More
1
1 comment
3
3 thanks
A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ed Friedlander
43 years experience Pathology
Ask your physician: Your physician will tell you whether you need to be given RhoGam to prevent you from becoming sensitized.
1
1 thank
A 51-year-old female asked:
Dr. John Munshower
29 years experience Family Medicine
Correct: You are correct. You can not be AB with a biological father of O. You can google Blood type charts to confirm all the possibilities. Best wishes to ... Read More
1
1 thank
A 60-year-old male asked:
Dr. Randy Baker
39 years experience Holistic Medicine
Many different ideas: According to Peter D'Adamo ND, Type B's should avoid corn, wheat, tomatoes, peanuts, chicken etc.-- see http://www.dadamo.com/txt/index.pl? ... Read More
2
2 thanks
A 36-year-old female asked:
Dr. Ankush Bansal
16 years experience Internal Medicine
??: What does that mean? There is no such thing as specific foods for certain blood types. If you have some chronic disease or take a medication, there m ... Read More
2
2 thanks
A 37-year-old female asked:
Dr. Ed Friedlander
43 years experience Pathology
Ignore that stuff: During the 1990's, a crooked physician published a series of books suggesting different lifestyles and diets for different blood groups. It was totall ... Read More
A 40-year-old female asked:
Dr. James Ferguson
45 years experience Pediatrics
?which test ?: Testing for celiac varies. There are blood tests, which can show positive with small amounts of gluten intake. (1/10 of a slice of bread)The most dram ... Read More
1
1 thank
A 51-year-old member asked:
Dr. Madhu Kandarpa
8 years experience Nephrology and Dialysis
None specific: I am not aware of any specific diet for ab blood group.
A member asked:
Dr. Quang Nguyen
Specializes in Endocrinology
Diabetes: This is consistent with diabetes. The 2 hour after challenge should be < 140. If 140-199, that's prediabetes. I'm not sure what you mean by "blood ... Read More
4
4 thanks
A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bennett Werner
43 years experience Cardiology
Shouldn't: I would think that would be okay although, to be really safe, it's usually recommended that you fast beforehand.
A 71-year-old male asked:
Dr. Lewis Hassell
38 years experience Pathology
Anemia of Chronic Dz: Your elevated ferritin and depressed serum iron suggests an anemia related to chronic disease. This is a perplexing problem to solve without a careful ... Read More
A 57-year-old male asked:
Dr. Dwain Rickertsen
35 years experience Family Medicine
Family Practice: The blood type diet follows the theory that blood types are compatible with certain foods and essentially allergic to others. There is a book blood t ... Read More
A 26-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ed Friedlander
43 years experience Pathology
This is rubbish: &quot;Blood group diets&quot; are total bunk. They have no scientific basis. It was made up by a cynical charlatan in order to sell books to people wh ... Read More
1
1 thank
A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael H. T. Sia
30 years experience Pediatrics
Gastroenterologist?: If you are truly concerned about his stools, either discuss and start with preliminary evaluation and studies with your pediatrician or see a pediatri ... Read More
1
1 thank
A 34-year-old male asked:
Dr. Pamela Pappas
41 years experience Psychiatry
Carbohydrates: Eaten alone, chapathi and rice may cause your blood sugar to rise rapidly. Insulin doses and pancreatic response may not be able to keep up. If you ... Read More
1
1 thank
A female asked:
Dr. Ronald Krauser
51 years experience Rheumatology
Yes: Myeloma is one of many possible causes for anemia but GI issues also need to be eliminated. The high calcium can also be associated with myeloma but a ... Read More
A 48-year-old female asked:
Dr. Jack Rubin
47 years experience Nephrology and Dialysis
Low potassium: If you have a poor diet, you may have a low serum magnesium (m) level. If your m is low, you will have a low serum potassium (k), which will not be no ... Read More
A 27-year-old female asked:
Dr. Shoaib Shafique
33 years experience Vascular Surgery
No: No direct relationship between gall stones and acne.
1
1 thank
A 26-year-old female asked:
Dr. Cayce Jehaimi
20 years experience Pediatric Endocrinology
Low carb/grain diet: cut our grains/limit starches and increase good fats (olive oil, avocado, nuts). have good animal based protein intake (including organic eggs and fis ... Read More
A 50-year-old member asked:
Dr. Donald Alves
23 years experience Emergency Medicine
Universal donor: Someone with AB blood has both A and B antigens on their red cells. O blood has neither on them. AB recipient's body would not notice O's absence of A ... Read More
A 35-year-old female asked:
Dr. Randy Baker
39 years experience Holistic Medicine
Malabsorption: B12 is readily available in foods of animal origin (including dairy &amp; eggs) so unless one is vegan you'll get enough via diet unless you can't abs ... Read More
1
1 comment
2
2 thanks
A 52-year-old member asked:
Dr. Dan Fisher
26 years experience Internal Medicine
Avoid it.: Not sure what testing you had done, but... If you reliably develop symptoms with ingestion, then stop eating it. There are two common wheat relate ... Read More

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

Ask doctors free
Personalized answers
Free
Talk to a doctor
Unlimited visits
$10/month